Life Extension Magazine

Life Extension Magazine August 2010

Abstracts

Omega-3

Omega-3 fatty acids for major depressive disorder during pregnancy: results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND: Perinatal depression is common, and treatment remains challenging. Depression has been reported to be associated with the abnormality of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). A profound decrease of omega-3 PUFAs in the mother during pregnancy is associated with the higher demand of fetal development and might precipitate the occurrence of depression. In this study, we examined the efficacy of omega-3 PUFA monotherapy for the treatment of depression during pregnancy. METHOD: From June 2004 to June 2006, we conducted an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing omega-3 PUFAs (3.4 g/d) with placebo in pregnant women with major depressive disorder (DSM-IV criteria). No psychotropic agent was given 1 month prior to or during the study period. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) was scored every other week as the primary measurement of efficacy, while the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were secondary measures. RESULTS: Thirty-six subjects were randomly assigned to either omega-3 PUFAs or placebo, and 33 among them were evaluated in more than 2 visits. A total of 24 subjects completed the study. As compared to the placebo group, subjects in the omega-3 group had significantly lower HAM-D scores at weeks 6 (p = .001) and 8 (p = .019), a significantly higher response rate (62% vs. 27%, p = .03), and a higher remission rate, although the latter did not reach statistical significance (38% vs. 18%, p = .28). At the study end point, subjects in the omega-3 group also had significantly lower depressive symptom ratings on the EPDS and BDI. The omega-3 PUFAs were well tolerated and there were no adverse effects on the subjects and newborns. CONCLUSIONS: Omega-3 PUFAs may have therapeutic benefits in depression during pregnancy. In regard to the safety issue and psychotherapeutic effect, as well as health promotion to mothers and their newborns, it is worthy to conduct replication studies in a larger sample with a broad regimen of omega-3 PUFAs in pregnant women with depression. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier:

J Clin Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;69(4):644-51

Ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid for the treatment of psychological distress and depressive symptoms in middle-aged women: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial.

BACKGROUND: Psychological distress (PD) and depressive

symptoms are commonly observed during menopausal transition. Studies suggest that omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids may help alleviate depression. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to compare enriched ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid (E-EPA) supplementation with placebo for the treatment of PD and depressive symptoms in middle-aged women. DESIGN: Women with moderate-to-severe PD (n = 120) were randomly assigned to receive 1.05 g E-EPA/d plus 0.15 g ethyl-docosahexaenoic acid/d (n = 59) or placebo (n = 61) for 8 wk. The main outcomes were 8-wk changes in PD scores [Psychological General Well-Being Schedule (PGWB)] and depressive scales [20-item Hopkins Symptom Checklist Depression Scale (HSCL-D-20) and the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-21)]. RESULTS: At baseline, women with PD were mildly to moderately depressed, and 24% met the major depressive episode (MDE) criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. After 8 wk, outcomes improved in both groups, but no significant differences were noted between them. Stratification analyses for MDE diagnosis at baseline indicated that differences in adjusted 8-wk changes between the E-EPA group without MDE (n = 46) and the placebo group (n = 45) were 8.0 (95% CI: 0.6, 15.3; P = 0.034) for the PGWB, -0.2 (95% CI: -0.01, -0.4; P = 0.040) for the HSCL-D-20, and -2.7 (95% CI: -0.3, -5.1; P = 0.030) for the HAM-D-21. Differences in adjusted 8-wk changes between the E-EPA group with MDE (n = 13) and the placebo group (n = 16) were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first trial of n-3 supplementation in the treatment of PD and depressive symptoms in middle-aged women. In women with PD without MDE at baseline, the 8-wk changes in PD and depressive scales improved significantly more with E-EPA than with placebo.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Feb;89(2):641-51

Omega-3 treatment of childhood depression: a controlled, double-blind pilot study.

OBJECTIVE: Major depressive disorder in children may be more common than previously thought, and its therapeutics are unclear. Because of success in a previous study on omega-3 fatty acids in adult major depressive disorder, the authors planned a pilot study of omega-3 fatty acids in childhood major depression. METHOD: Children who entered the study were between the ages of 6 and 12. Ratings were performed at baseline and at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks using Children’s Depression Rating Scale (CDRS), Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), and Clinical Global Impression (CGI). Children were randomized to omega-3 fatty acids or placebo as pharmacologic monotherapy. Twenty-eight patients were randomized, and 20 completed at least 1 month’s ratings. RESULTS: Analysis of variance showed highly significant effects of omega-3 on symptoms using the CDRS, CDI, and CGI. CONCLUSIONS: Omega-3 fatty acids may have therapeutic benefits in childhood depression.

Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Jun;163(6):1098-100

Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the blood of children and adolescents with juvenile bipolar disorder.

Reduced long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA), including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been reported in adult patients suffering from depression and bipolar disorder (BD). LCn-3PUFA status has not previously been examined in children and adolescents with BD compared with healthy controls. Fifteen children and adolescents (9-18 years, M +/- SD = 14.4 +/- 3.48) diagnosed with juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD) and fifteen healthy age and sex-matched controls were assessed for dietary intake and fasting red blood cell (RBC) membrane concentrations of LCn-3PUFA. Fatty acid concentrations were compared between participants diagnosed with JBD and controls after controlling for dietary intake. RBC membrane concentrations of EPA and DHA were not significantly lower in participants diagnosed with JBD compared with healthy controls (M +/- sem EPA = 3.37 +/- 0.26 vs. 3.69 +/- 0.27 microg/mL, P = 0.458; M +/- sem DHA = 22.08 +/- 2.23 vs. 24.61 +/- 2.38 microg/mL, P = 0.528) after controlling for intake. Red blood cell DHA was negatively (r = -0.55; P = 0.044) related to clinician ratings of depression. Although lower RBC concentrations of LCn-3PUFA were explained by lower intakes in the current study, previous evidence has linked reduced LCn-3PUFA to the aetiology of BD. As RBC DHA was also negatively related to symptoms of depression, a randomised placebo-controlled study examining supplementation with LCn-3PUFA as an adjunct to standard pharmacotherapy appears warranted in this patient population.

Lipids. 2008 Nov;43(11):1031-8

Deficits in docosahexaenoic acid and associated elevations in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids in the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of patients with bipolar disorder.

Previous antemortem and postmortem tissue fatty acid composition studies have observed significant deficits in the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cell (RBC) and postmortem cortical membranes of patients with unipolar depression. In the present study, we determined the fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, Brodmann area 10) of patients with bipolar disorder (n=18) and age-matched normal controls (n=19) by gas chromatography. After correction for multiple comparisons, DHA (-24%), arachidonic acid (-14%), and stearic acid (C18:0) (-4.5%) compositions were significantly lower, and cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) (+12.5%) composition significantly higher, in the OFC of bipolar patients relative to normal controls. Based on metabolite:precursor ratios, significant elevations in arachidonic acid, stearic acid, and palmitic acid conversion/metabolism were observed in the OFC of bipolar patients, and were inversely correlated with DHA composition. Deficits in OFC DHA and arachidonic acid composition, and elevations in arachidonic acid metabolism, were numerically (but not significantly) greater in drug-free bipolar patients relative to patients treated with mood-stabilizer or antipsychotic medications. OFC DHA and arachidonic acid deficits were greater in patients plus normal controls with high vs. low alcohol abuse severity. These results add to a growing body of evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acid deficiency as well as the OFC in the pathoaetiology of bipolar disorder.

Psychiatry Res. 2008 Sep 30;160(3):285-99

Omega-3 fatty acids in bipolar disorder: a preliminary double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND: Omega-3 fatty acids may inhibit neuronal signal transduction pathways in a manner similar to that of lithium carbonate and valproate, 2 effective treatments for bipolar disorder. The present study was performed to examine whether omega-3 fatty acids also exhibit mood-stabilizing properties in bipolar disorder. METHODS: A 4-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, comparing omega-3 fatty acids (9.6 g/d) vs placebo (olive oil), in addition to usual treatment, in 30 patients with bipolar disorder. RESULTS: A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of the cohort found that the omega-3 fatty acid patient group had a significantly longer period of remission than the placebo group (P = .002; Mantel-Cox). In addition, for nearly every other outcome measure, the omega-3 fatty acid group performed better than the placebo group. CONCLUSION: Omega-3 fatty acids were well tolerated and improved the short-term course of illness in this preliminary study of patients with bipolar disorder.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999 May;56(5):407-12

Omega-3 fatty acid treatment and T(2) whole brain relaxation times in bipolar disorder.

OBJECTIVE: The authors hypothesized that changes in brain membrane composition resulting from omega-3 fatty acid administration in patients with bipolar disorder would result in greater membrane fluidity, as detected by reductions in T(2) values. METHOD: Women with bipolar disorder (N=12) received omega-3 fatty acids for 4 weeks. A cohort of bipolar subjects (N=9) and a group without bipolar disorder (N=12) did not receive omega-3 fatty acids. T(2) values were acquired at baseline and after 4 weeks. RESULTS: Bipolar subjects who received omega-3 fatty acids had significant decreases in T(2). There was a dose-dependent effect when the bipolar omega-3 fatty acid group was subdivided into high- and low-dose cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Omega-3 fatty acids lowered T(2) values, consistent with the hypothesis that the fluidity of cell membranes was altered. Further studies are needed to clarify the significance of alterations in brain physiology induced by omega-3 fatty acids, as reflected in T(2) values.

Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Oct;161(10):1922-4

Omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid in bipolar depression: report of a small open-label study.

INTRODUCTION: Epidemiologic studies have suggested that consumption of cold water fish oils may have some protective function against depression. This proposition is supported by a series of biochemical and pharmacologic studies that have suggested that fatty acids may modulate neurotransmitter metabolism and cell signal trans-duction in humans and that abnormalities in fatty acid and eicosanoid metabolism may play a causal role in depression. Aware of the critical need for antidepression treatments that might not carry the risk of precipitating a manic episode in bipolar patients, we decided to conduct an open-label add-on trial of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in bipolar depression. METHOD: Twelve bipolar I outpatients with depressive symptoms diagnosed by DSM-IV were treated with 1.5 to 2 g/day of the omega-3 fatty acid EPA for up to 6 months. The study was conducted between September 2001 and January 2003. RESULTS: Eight of the 10 patients who completed at least 1 month of follow-up achieved a 50% or greater reduction in Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores within 1 month. No patients developed hypomania or manic symptoms. No significant side effects were reported. LIMITATIONS: This study is limited both by the open-label design and by the small sample size. As in all previous reported studies, patients in this study were treated in an outpatient setting, so that the most severely depressed bipolar patients (requiring hospitalization) are not represented. CONCLUSIONS: Although the ultimate utility of omega-3 fatty acids in bipolar depression is still an open question, we believe that these initial results are encouraging, especially for mild to moderate bipolar depression, and justify the continuing exploration of its use.

J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;66(6):726-9

Omega-3 fatty acids for bipolar disorder.

BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder is a complex psychiatric disorder and is amongst the top thirty causes of worldwide disability. Mood stabilisers are the primary pharmacological intervention, both in the treatment of acute episodes and in prophylaxis. There is, however, mounting evidence that dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may be beneficial in psychiatric conditions, particularly those involving disturbances of mood. OBJECTIVES: To review the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids as either a monotherapy or an adjunctive treatment for bipolar disorder. SEARCH STRATEGY: Electronic searches of the following databases were performed: CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References were searched on 12/2/2008, Supplementary searches were carried out on Biological Abstracts, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, CCDAN Register, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. The search strategy also included cited reference searching, personal contact with all authors of studies initially included and contact with the omega-3 producing pharmaceutical companies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All relevant randomised controlled trials were included in the review. Studies involving males and females of all ages with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder qualified for inclusion. Studies using any type or dose of omega-3 fatty acid treatment as monotherapy or in addition to standard pharmacotherapy were eligible. The primary outcome was symptom severity; and secondary outcomes were adverse effects, dropout and satisfaction with treatment. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently inspected the citations identified from the search. Potentially relevant abstracts were identified and full papers ordered and reassessed for inclusion and methodological quality. All relevant data were extracted. The weighted mean difference (WMD) was used for continuous outcome data, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). MAIN RESULTS: Five studies met inclusion criteria for the review, however, methodological quality was highly variable. Only one study, involving 75 participants, provided data for analysis, and showed a benefit of active treatment over control for depression symptom levels (WMD -3.93, 95% CI -7.00 to -0.86)and Clinical Global Impression scores (WMD -0.75, 95% CI -1.33 to -0.17) but not for mania (WMD -2.81, 95% CI -7.68 to 1.90). No serious adverse effects were reported in the five studies. The pattern of dropout was highly variable between studies. AUTHORS’ CONCLUSIONS: Results from one study showed positive effects of omega-3 as an adjunctive treatment for depressive but not manic symptoms in bipolar disorder. These findings must be regarded with caution owing to the limited data available. There is an acute need for well-designed and executed randomised controlled trials in this field.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008 Apr 16;(2):CD005169

Efficacy of omega-3 Fatty acids in mood disorders - a systematic review and metaanalysis.

Objectives: Existing efficacy trials of Omega-3 (omega-3) fatty acids in mood disorders have yielded inconsistent results. The current paper is an effort to provide a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids in treatment of mood disorders. Design:We searched Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials registry up to June 2008 for randomized trials investigating efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders.We conducted random effects meta-analyses.We used the I2 statistic to quantify between-study inconsistency, and conducted pre-specified subgroup analyses to explore potential explanations for inconsistency. Observations:We included 21 trials in our systematic review and found 13 trials to be eligible for meta-analysis. The pooled standardized mean difference in depressed mood states (n = 554 in 12 trials) was -0.47 (95% CI:-0.92,-0.02; I2 = 82.7; p = 0.07) and in manic mood states (n = 126 in 4 trials) was 0.22 (95% CI: -0.21, 0.65; I2 = 40.5; p = 0.31).We did not identify any treatment- subgroup interaction across forms of omega-3 fatty acids preparations (P = 0.99) or patient diagnosis (bipolar vs. unipolar depressive disorder; P = 0.96); there was a significant correlation between omega-3 fatty acids dose and treatment effect on depressive symptoms (r = 0.5, p = 0.04), but not on manic symptoms (P = 0.3). Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that omega-3 fatty acids are a potential treatment of depressive disorders, but not mania. The unexplained between-study inconsistency and imprecision of the pooled estimates mitigate this suggestion. Large randomized placebo-controlled trials are needed to better estimate the value of this intervention for patients with depression.

Psychopharmacol Bull. 2009;42(3):39-54

Reduced mania and depression in juvenile bipolar disorder associated with long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.

Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCn-3PUFA) supplementation may improve symptoms of depression in children and bipolar disorder (BD) in adults. No studies have examined the effectiveness of LCn-3PUFA supplementation in the treatment of mania and depression in juvenile BD (JBD) when given as an adjunct to standard pharmacological

treatment. Eighteen children and adolescents with JBD received supplements containing 360 mg per day eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1,560 mg per day docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for 6 weeks in an open-label study. Intake and fasting red blood cell (RBC) LCn-3PUFA, mania, depression and global function were assessed before and after supplementation. RBC EPA and DHA were significantly higher following supplementation. Clinician ratings of mania and depression were significantly lower and global functioning significantly higher after supplementation. Parent ratings of internalizing and externalizing behaviours were also significantly lower following supplementation. A larger randomized controlled trial appears warranted in this participant population.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Aug;63(8):1037-40

Efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on improvement of bipolar symptoms: a systematic review.

The purpose of this review was to examine the current level of evidence regarding the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in improving bipolar disorder symptoms. Of 99 articles meeting initial search criteria, 5 randomized control trials and 2 quasi-experimental studies were selected for review. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation was effective in 4 of 7 studies. Those using an omega-3 combination of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexanoic acid demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in bipolar symptoms, whereas those using a single constituent did not. Dosage variations did not demonstrate statistically significant differences. Due to its benign side effect profile and some evidence supporting its usefulness in bipolar illness, omega-3 may be a helpful adjunct in treatment of selected patients. Future studies are needed to conclusively confirm the efficacy of omega-3s in bipolar disorder, uncovering a new well-tolerated treatment option.

Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2008 Oct;22(5):305-11