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Life Extension Magazine

LE Magazine May 2001

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David Collins: skeptical at first

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David Collins, 53 was very skeptical. For some time, Caroline had been in constant pain and was eager to find a fresh approach. Fifteen months later David joined Dr. Greville's steadily increasing client base and has become a very strong supporter of the treatment paradigm offered.

When another client of the Longevity Institute of Australia at the Redwood Clinic first visited with his wife Caroline, 49, David Collins, 53 was very skeptical. For some time, Caroline had been in constant pain and was eager to find a fresh approach. Fifteen months later David joined Dr. Greville’s steadily increasing client base and has become a very strong supporter of the treatment paradigm offered.

“Both her friends and I began to notice that Caroline was a different person. It showed up in terms of her more healthy approach to life, and after suffering numerous pain-related problems for a long time, she was responding much more positively to everything rather than being constantly down in the dumps. It was as if the changes in diet and the things she was doing changed her whole demeanor,” said David.

“If it weren’t for that change in her, I wouldn’t have agreed to come back and do the program, and I have now been through the initial screening at her encouragement.”

Commenting on Caroline’s situation, Dr. Greville said that when she joined the program, her initial assessment suggested a functional age far greater than her biological age. That has now reverted, and she is recognizably younger.

“Of course everything is relative, so what it really means is that her rate of aging has decreased,” Dr. Greville said. “Not everything has been corrected yet, but she is well on her way —she looks positively at her health. This means she regularly takes lifestyle and dietary measures and certain supplements as well. Now that her husband is involved, there is a synergism—one can help the other.”

Following Dr. Greville’s assessment, David has changed his diet, eliminating red meat and drinking red wine instead of the typical Aussie favorite, beer. “I now realize that my diet needed improvement in order to address potential future problems, and I’m pleased to say that drinking red wine is pretty easy to take.”

David has eliminated wheat products, reduced milk products and increased his consumption of soy, fish, fresh fruit and fresh vegetables. He is taking multivitamins, antioxidants and occasionally an immune booster. And his physical program includes more aerobic exercise.

His hormones were within a normal range so he requires no correctional supplements. Every three to four months, his antioxidant status is measured and the results are sent to the United States for analysis. Laboratories in the U.S. are used frequently because of their expertise in oxidation studies. The studies indicate the amount of oxidative damage and the amount of antioxidants in the blood. Some people, according to Dr. Greville, might have low oxidative damage but low antioxidants, while others might have high oxidative damage and low antioxidants. And the converse of each is possible.

David was found to have minor imbalances in vitamin levels and deficiencies in his minerals, especially selenium, which is not uncommon in Australia. Most people should use organically grown vegetables, Dr. Greville said, because of the high level of pollution in standard vegetables.

“There is so much toxicity in pesticides and preservatives that we need some supplementation. For some people this is minimal, but for others it is much greater. We tailor the supplements to the individual accordingly. There are some general principles and then depending on the metabolic, physiological and terrain assessments, we vary that accordingly.”

David is clearly at the lower end of the spectrum, requiring only minor intervention. His goal, however, is to improve his general health status, even though his tests showed no difference between his biological age and his functional age.

Alison Hammer: blood group diet changed her life

Two years ago Alison Hammer, 41, was 22 pounds heavier than her quite petite frame today. And she knew she had to do something about it because she was heading the same way as her mother, who is clinically obese. She decided to consult Dr. Greville, who recognized instantly that she was not eating according to her blood group.

“I’m an A, and all my life I’ve had a weight problem. I tried virtually all diets, including the high carbohydrate diets, but nothing worked. I used to like pasta and red meats, but Dr. Greville explained that large quantities of these are not appropriate for my blood group.”

He also advised her to take high protein drinks, fresh fruits and vegetables, less saturated fats and more fish, since this would be a natural way of increasing her metabolism and thus enable her to lose weight.

“Originally I found it a little difficult going off red meat and wheat, but I weaned myself off them slowly, initially by having only half servings. Now I have weaned them out to about 98% of the time. Every now and then I have either red meat or pasta and I find them so revolting I don’t have any more for a while—and the intervals are increasing. Once you get into the pattern, it is easy.”

Alison is also taking multivitamins, something she initially found foreign, as she “wasn’t into supplements or high protein drinks, so it meant developing a new mind-set.”

Walking for three-quarters of an hour each day as fast as she can without puffing too much is an additional part of her regime. Originally she had to make a conscious effort to do this, but today it is part of her lifestyle.

“The rewards are that my weight is stable, I feel much better and I am following the longevity principles. To find something like this has been a blessing, and most importantly, I have maintained my weight loss for almost two years now.”

An added bonus is that her 14-year-old daughter has joined her on the diet and follows it 90% of the time, despite strong peer pressure to eat junk food.

Other cultures show us how

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"The rewards are that my weight is stable, I feel much better and I am following the longevity principles. To find something like this has been a blessing."
According to Dr. Greville’s partner at the clinic, biochemist Dr. Bill Anton, at least five cultures routinely live to be up to 120 years of age: Tibetans, Hunzis, Russian Georgians, Armenians and Titicacans.

These people live in high glacial mountain villages at 8,500 to 14,000 feet. They are active in the field because they grow their own vegetables. They know one another so there is little stress. The stress is handled by the mayor, who often dies young.

The climates are very dry. Depending on the area, between 60 and 72 different minerals are found in the melted water that is released from under glaciers. That water has a milky consistency. For up to 5,000 years these people have been drinking that water and the soil has been continuously remineralized. Consequently the food is exceptionally nutritious.

It is now known that minerals in plants control cell metabolism in humans and animals and are essential for maintaining health and preventing disease. The residents of these high mountain villages are blessed with radiant health and boundless energy. Heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, glaucoma, birth defects, hyperactive children, learning disabilities, diabetes, arthritis, osteoporosis, cataracts, obesity and other diseases are almost nonexistent, Dr. Anton said.

“We have the same genetic potential of enjoying robust health until 100 and beyond. We also have the potential to reverse premature aging and disease by paying attention to our lifestyle and nutritional needs now.”

Longevity Institute of Australia at the Redwood Clinic, 627 Chapel St., South Yarra, Victoria 3141. Telephone: 011-613-9826-6665. Fax: 011-613-9826-6233. Contact person: Dr. Warwick Greville.

  

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