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Life Extension Magazine

LE Magazine June 2004
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Natural Prescriptions For Parkinson's Disease
By Bruce Scali

The Parkinson’s Prescription: Natural Treatments for Multiple Causes

Causative Factor

Diagnostic Test

Medical Treatment Natural Approach

Dopamine loss

P300 brainwave- brain voltage

Levodopa, ropinirole, COMT inhibitors

Tyrosine, vitamin B6, zinc, DHEA, phenylalanine

GABA and serotonin loss

Brain map (QEEG)

Paxil®, Effexor®, other antidepressants

L-theanine, vitamin B12, GABA, inositol, St. John’s
wort, tryptophan

Inorganic toxins/ heavy metals (iron,
manganese, copper)

EDTA challenge, RBC,serum heavy metals
lead, cadmium, (zinc)

D-penicillamine, BAL

IV chelation, zinc, CoQ10

Organic toxins
(MPTP, pesticides,
hydrocarbons)

Pesticide levels, fat biopsy

(None established)

Glutathione, N-acetylcysteine, methionine, cysteine,
sulfur

Oxidative stress

Homocysteine, vitamin B12, serum vitamin E and C, selenium, beta-carotene

Selegiline, antidepressants (e.g., Zoloft®, glutathione, polyphenols,
Wellbutrin®)

Super Alpha Lipoic Acid with Biotin, curcumin, bioflavonoids, tocotrienols

Inflammation

CRP, ESR, TH/TS, interleukin 6 and 8

COX-2 inhibitors (e.g.,Vioxx®, Celebrex®)

NSAIDs (e.g., aspirin,
ibuprofen), green
and black tea, Nexrutine®

Diminished vascular flow, stenosis, cholesterol, mini-strokes

MRI, MRA, PET scan, ultrasound, ABI

Statins (e.g., Zocor®, Lipitor®)

Aspirin, niacin, red
yeast, chelation,
IV HDL, policosanol

Hormonal
deficiencies

DHEA, testosterone, estrogen, progesterone

HGH injections, adrenal hormone, testosterone, estrogen, progesterone

Super MiraForte, HGH secretagogues,
DHEA

Petrification: calcium in the brain and
blood vessels with amyloid, mini-strokes

Ionized calcium, calcitonin, para-thyroid, progesterone, bone density studies

NMDA antagonists, calcium channel blockers (e.g., Procardia®)

Calcium, boron, strontium, calcitonin, vitamin D

Electrical loss or pause

BEAM (QEEG), PET scan

ECT

CES, TCMS

Metabolic loss

P300 brainwave, PET and SPECT scans

(None established)

CoQ10, creatine,
phosphatidylserine,
acetyl-L-carnitine

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