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LE Magazine August 2005
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Super Oxide Dismutase (SOD)

Boosting your body’s store of the enzyme SOD provides powerful protection against oxidative stress. By John Colman

Conclusion

Free radicals and oxidative stress are associated with accelerated aging and the onset of degenerative diseases. Internally generated anti-oxidants help protect against the effects of oxidative stress.

One of the most important antioxidant enzymes in humans is superoxide dismutase (SOD). Numerous studies correlate diminished SOD levels with disease, suggesting that abundant SOD promotes longer life. Two supplements in particular—SODzyme™ and GliSODin®—have been shown to boost levels of SOD and other antioxidant enzymes. SODzyme™ and GliSODin® offer promise in slowing aging, promoting longevity, relieving pain, modulating inflammation, and quenching free radicals. These powerful compounds may thus help promote good health and protect against many of the degenerative conditions associated with aging.

Editor’s note: People who are allergic to wheat, soy, corn, or gluten should consult their physician before using products containing SODzyme™ or GliSODin®.

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