Life Extension Final Clerance Sale

Life Extension Magazine

LE Magazine January 2008
In The News

CoQ10 May Prevent Migraine in Kids and Teens

CoQ10 May Prevent Migraine in Kids and Teens

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation may prevent migraine headaches in those who are deficient in this nutrient.* Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center assessed CoQ10 levels among more than 1,500 children and adolescents visiting a neurology clinic due to frequent headaches. Those with low CoQ10 levels were started on a program of CoQ10 supplementation. Their subsequent headaches and CoQ10 levels were monitored.

About one third of the children and adolescents referred to the clinic for frequent headaches were CoQ10 deficient. A subset of patients who were seen in follow-up after about three months had normalized CoQ10 levels. The normalized CoQ10 patients reported fewer headaches, while headache disability scores decreased by more than half, overall. “Deficiency of CoQ10 may be common in…migraine…,” investigators concluded, “…supplementation may result in clinical improvement.”

—Dale Kiefer

Reference

* Hershey AD, Powers SW, Vockell AL, et al. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency and response to supplementation in pediatric and adolescent migraine. Headache. 2007 Jan;47(1):73-80.

Folic Acid Supplementation Helps Reduce Arsenic Levels

Folic acid supplementation can significantly lower blood levels of arsenic, a toxic element found in contaminated water.* Chronic exposure to arsenic affects more than 100 million individuals worldwide and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, skin, liver, and bladder cancer, and other health conditions.

In this randomized, double-blind trial, researchers at Columbia University gave 400 mcg/day of folic acid or placebo to 130 folate-deficient participants in Bangladesh, where arsenic exposure is prevalent. After 12 weeks, they found that folic acid dramatically reduced blood arsenic levels by 14%.

“Folic acid supplementation enhanced the detoxification of arsenic to a form that is more readily excreted in urine,” Dr Gamble, the study’s lead author, explained. “The results of this study suggest that a simple, low-cost nutritional intervention may help to prevent some of the long-term health consequences associated with arsenic exposure for the many populations at risk,” she concluded.

—Dayna Dye

Reference

* Gamble MV, Liu X, Slavkovich V, et al. Folic acid supplementation lowers blood arsenic. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Oct;86(4):1202-9.

Creatine, CLA Strengthen Exercise in Seniors

Creatine, CLA Strengthen Exercise in Seniors

Supplementing with creatine and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) enhances the beneficial effects of exercise training in older subjects.*

Researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, recruited 19 men and 20 women aged 65 and older to undergo twice-weekly resistance exercise training. The subjects were randomized to receive creatine, 5 g/day, and CLA, 6 g/day, or a placebo for six months.

At the end of treatment, functional capacity measures, such as walking, balance, sitting, standing, and stair climbing, improved in both groups, though the supplemented group experienced a greater benefit. Compared with placebo, this group also showed significantly better improvement in strength and muscle endurance and a significant increase in fat free mass and loss of body fat.

The researchers concluded that, “creatine monohydrate and CLA can enhance some of the beneficial effects of training over a six month period.”

—Dayna Dye

Reference

* Tarnopolsky M, Zimmer A, Paikin J, et al. Creatine monohydrate and conjugated linoleic acid improve strength and body composition following resistance exercise in older adults. PLoS ONE. 2007 Oct 3;2(10):e991.

Preventing the Spread of Breast Cancer

Preventing the Spread of Breast Cancer

Consuming enough calcium may help strengthen bones so they are less likely to be penetrated by the spread of breast cancer (metastasis), according to a recent study.*

A team of researchers administered diets of low or normal calcium levels to female mice concurrently with osteoprotegerin, a drug that reduces bone-destructive activity. Breast cancer tumors were then implanted into the animals after three days. Just over two weeks later, the investigators found that the low-calcium group experienced a 43% increase in bone destruction and a 24% increase in cancer cell proliferation compared with animals whose calcium intake was normal.

“Many older women in our community are known to be calcium deficient due to low calcium dietary intake or due to vitamin D deficiency. These women could be at increased risk for the devastating effects of bone metastases,” the investigators concluded.

—Dayna Dye

Reference

* Zheng Y, Zhou H, Modzelewski JR, et al. Accelerated bone resorption, due to dietary calcium deficiency, promotes breast cancer tumor growth in bone. Cancer Res. 2007 Oct 1;67(19):9542-8.

Red Wine, Resveratrol Protect Against Food-Borne Illness

Red Wine, Resveratrol Protect Against Food-Borne Illness

New research has uncovered yet another benefit of red wine and resveratrol—that of combating potentially fatal food-borne illnesses.*

A team from the University of Missouri discovered that red wines, particularly Cabernet, Zinfandel, and Merlot, inhibited food-borne pathogens including E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, and H. pylori, without harming beneficial probiotic bacteria. The most promising results were seen with H. pylori, which causes stomach ulcers.

Ethanol (the alcohol that occurs in wine), pH levels, and resveratrol were separately found to have similar effects. Grape juice was also effective, but not white wine.

The researchers stated that phytochemicals in red wine, resveratrol being the main one, play a role not just as antioxidants but also inhibit food-borne pathogens. They concluded, “Now, we’re concentrating mainly on the resveratrol effects on these pathogens.”

—Dayna Dye

Reference

* Available at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=487122&i_page_id=1770. Accessed October 12, 2007.

Inhibiting 5-Lipoxygenase Promotes Prostate Cancer Cell Death

Administering a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor to prostate cancer cells promotes massive programmed cell death, according to a study from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.1

The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) converts dietary arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyarachidonate (5-HPETE), which is rapidly converted to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), a survival factor for human prostate cancer cells.1,2 Arachidonic acid is an omega-6 fatty acid common in the Western diet. The same pathway that produces 5-HETE also leads to the production of pro-inflammatory leukotrienes, which have been implicated in a number of inflammatory conditions, including asthma, allergies, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis and, possibly, tumor formation.3,4

When scientists administered a 5-LOX inhibitor to prostate cancer cells growing in culture, 5-HETE production was completely blocked, inducing “massive apoptosis [programmed cell death] in both hormone-responsive and hormone-nonresponsive human prostate cancer cells.”1

The herb Boswellia serrata, in the form of 5-LoxinTM, provides a natural strategy for blocking the 5-LOX enzyme.5

—Dale Kiefer

Reference

1. Ghosh J, Myers CE. Inhibition of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase triggers massive apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Oct 27;95(22):13182-7.
2. Gupta S, Srivastava M, Ahmad N, Sakamoto K, Bostwick DG, Mukhtar H. Lipoxygenase-5 is overexpressed in prostate adenocarcinoma. Cancer. 2001 Feb 15;91(4):737-43.
3. Radmark O, Werz O, Steinhilber D, Samuelsson B. 5-Lipoxygenase: regulation of expression and enzyme activity. Trends Biochem Sci. 2007 Jul;32(7):332-41.
4. Werz O, Steinhilber D. Development of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors—lessons from cellular enzyme regulation. Biochem Pharmacol. 2005 Aug 1;70(3):327-33.
5. Ammon HP. Boswellic acids (components of frankincense) as the active principle in treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. Wien Med Wochenschr. 2002;152(15-16):373-8.

N-Acetyl Cysteine May Curb Gambling Addiction

A new study reveals that the amino acid N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) may help to curb addictive behavior in compulsive gamblers.*

Researchers from the University of Minnesota gave increasing doses of NAC to 27 pathological gamblers for eight weeks, with a mean dose of nearly 1,500 mg/day. At the end of treatment, 16 out of 27 (60%) participants reported a reduced urge to gamble. Of these 16 responders, 13 entered a placebo-controlled phase for a further six weeks. During this phase, 83% of those who received NAC responded favorably, compared with only 28.6% of the placebo group.

N-acetyl cysteine may help control addiction by its effect on glutamate, a brain chemical which is frequently associated with reward. “It looks very promising,” stated Dr. Grant, the study’s author. “We were able to reduce people’s urges to gamble… This research could be encouraging for a lot of addictions,” he concluded.

—Dayna Dye

Reference

* Grant JE, Kim SW, Odlaug BL. N-acetyl cysteine, a glutamate-modulating agent, in the treatment of pathological gambling: a pilot study. Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Sep 15;62(6):652-7.