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Life Extension Magazine

Life Extension Magazine May 2011
As We See It

My Recent Life-Altering Event

By William Faloon

William Faloon’s Blood Test Results as of March 4, 2011

As we age, it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve optimal blood test readings.

For example, aging can cause glucose-insulin levels to spike, along with C-reactive protein (CRP), homocysteine, and lipids (LDL, triglycerides, and total cholesterol).

To protect against deadly atherosclerosis, aggressive individualized interventions are often required.

I am genetically predisposed to develop atherosclerosis at a relatively early age. When I was 35 years old, my LDL was 160 (mg/dL). I took steps at age 35 to reduce it. As you can see on the next page, I got my LDL down to 62 on my last blood draw. I plan to keep it in this low range for the next few years with the objective of reversing atherosclerotic plaque that might have built up in my younger years. I am 56 years old now, by the way.

Despite taking many homocysteine-lowering agents, my homocysteine reading on the last test was 10 (µmol/L). Ideally it should be below 8, but I have never gotten mine below 9. When conventional doctors tell me not to worry about homocysteine, I quickly respond by stating that if I did not aggressively try to lower my homocysteine it would be over 22 right now. I know this based on my father’s high homocysteine levels. (He suffered his first heart attack at age 52.)

I have been keeping my glucose under 90 (mg/dL) recently, but this particular test showed it at 92—a higher than desired level. We know that for optimal protection against vascular disease, glucose should be kept between 70-85. Considering that I take 850 mg of the anti-diabetic drug metformin 2 to 3 times a day, 50 mg of the drug acarbose before carbohydrate-containing meals, and the Calorie Control Weight Management Formula before the two heaviest meals of the day, you would think that I could push glucose down to perfect ranges. A lot of people who follow this program do achieve these low glucose levels, but my body does not respond the same way. I remind conventional critics that if I was not taking these aggressive steps to keep glucose levels in check, I might be diabetic by now.

My HDL of 52 mg/dL is not as high as it usually is, but considering how low my total cholesterol and LDL are, it is satisfactory for now.

One genetic factor favoring me is a virtually nonexistent level of C-reactive protein. It has always been low and seems to be going down as I age (instead of the reverse that happens to most people.).

My estradiol level dropped too low on a previous test, so I stopped taking Arimidex®. As you can see, my estradiol shot up to 43.8 (pg/mL), which I will suppress by taking about 1 mg of Arimidex® each week. DHEA is too high and reflects the 25 mg capsule I took right before my blood was drawn. (Ideally, one should take any hormones approximately 2 hours before the blood test. My DHEA likely did not have time to be converted into its other metabolites and was thus too high.)

My creatinine level moved just over 1.00 mg/dL, which indicates some kidney dysfunction in response to taking a few doses of ibuprofen a few days before my blood was drawn. My creatinine has historically dropped upon cessation of ibuprofen. There should be a warning about kidney toxicity on ibuprofen bottles, but the FDA does not require it.

My PSA of 0.6 ng/mL is desirably low for my age and reflects aggressive measures I have taken for almost a decade to suppress it. (It had been higher in the past.) We know from previous studies that PSA itself can facilitate prostate cancer by breaking down anatomical barriers in the prostate gland that block isolated prostate cancer cells from expanding.

You may notice my iron level is high on the basic test, but I was able to have the lab use the retained blood sample to test for ferritin, which is a much more reliable indicator of one’s body iron stores. Due to the uniqueness in my biochemistry it appears I have higher blood iron, but lower body stores of iron.

My free testosterone level is in the ideal range of 20-25 pg/mL because I use a topical testosterone gel several days a week. At age 43 it was below 8 pg/mL, and I suffered the outward symptoms of testosterone deficiency (such as low energy, abdominal weight gain, and brain fog). I have been on testosterone replacement for the past 12 years and enjoy no longer having symptoms of testosterone deficiency!

My 25-hydroxyvitamin D of 55.8 ng/mL is in the optimal range of 50-80 ng/mL that we suggest at Life Extension. It reflects the 7,000 IU of vitamin D I take each day.

Why Some Doctors Are Confused About Hormones

It should be noted that the hormone reference ranges provided by most labs are age-adjusted ranges, meaning that as we get older, the labs keep lowering the reference range. That is why people who take hormones to restore their levels to what they were when they were young may get back blood results marked high. This can be disconcerting for doctors who are not familiar with the idea of restoring youthful hormone levels. They often end up telling patients to stop taking the hormones without understanding the concept that higher values on blood tests are possible when restoring youthful hormone levels. If you are working with a doctor knowledgeable in hormone restoration, he/she will likely expect to see some higher values above the lab’s age-adjusted reference ranges, depending on the age of the person and the treatment given.

Based on my 30-year medical history of blood testing, I would be very ill or dead now if I had not taken aggressive steps to reverse my individual markers of impending diseases. Blood testing in the past has uncovered elevated PSA and serum calcium; high LDL, triglycerides, glucose, and cholesterol; kidney damage; high homocysteine and estradiol; along with low free testosterone. I took corrective actions, and as you can see by the results below, I have achieved optimal levels of virtually every marker of degenerative disease.

For longer life,

For Longer Life 

William Faloon

Below are William Faloon’s complete blood results.

Patient Name
Faloon, Bill

Sex
M

Age
56

LifeExtension/Natl Diagnostic
1100 W. Commercial Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale, Fl 33309

Control #
09134075014

Draw
03/04/11

Entered
03/04/11

Last Report
03/09/11

ACC: 0913407501482244

PID:

 

General Comments

Tests

Results

 

Units

Reference Interval

Lab

CMP14+LP+4AC+CBC/D/Plt

 

 

 

 

 

Chemistries

 

 

 

 

01

Glucose, Serum

92

 

mg/dL

65-99

01

Uric Acid, Serum

4.9

 

mg/dL

2.4-8.2

01

**Please note reference interval change**

 

 

 

 

 

BUN

20

 

mg/dL

6-24

01

Creatinine, Serum

1.01

 

mg/dL

0.76-1.27

01

eGFR

>59

 

mL/min/1.73

>59

 

eGFR AfricanAmerican

>59

 

mL/min/1.73

>59

 

Note: Persistent reduction for 3 months or more in an eGFR
<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 defines CKD.  Patients with eGFR values >/=60 mL/min/1.73 m2 may also have CKD if evidence of persistent proteinuria is present. Additional information may be found at www.kdoqi.org.

BUN/Creatinine Ratio

20

 

 

9-20

 

Sodium, Serum

139

 

mmol/L

135-145

01

Potassium, Serum

4.2

 

mmol/L

3.5-5.2

01

Chloride, Serum

103

 

mmol/L

97-108

01

Carbon Dioxide, Total

26

 

mmol/L

20-32

01

Calcium, Serum

9.4

 

mg/dL

8.7-10.2

01

Phosphorus, Serum

3.1

 

mg/dL

2.5-4.5

01

Protein, Total, Serum

7.2

 

g/dL

6.0-8.5

01

Albumin, Serum

4.6

 

g/dL

3.5-5.5

01

Globulin, Total

2.6

 

g/dL

1.5-4.5

 

A/G Ratio

1.8

 

 

1.1-2.5

 

Bilirubin, Total

0.6

 

mg/dL

0.0-1.2

01

Alkaline Phosphatase, S

44

 

IU/L

25-150

01

LDH

127

 

IU/L

100-250

01

AST (SGOT)

29

 

IU/L

0-40

01

ALT (SGPT)

28

 

IU/L

0-55

01

Iron, Serum

225

H

ug/dL

40-155

01

Lipids

 

 

 

 

01

Cholesterol, Total

128

 

mg/dL

100-199

01

Triglycerides

69

 

mg/dL

0-149

01

HDL Cholesterol

52

 

mg/dL

>39

01

Comment

 

 

 

 

01

According to ATP-III Guidelines, HDL-C >59 mg/dL is considered a negative risk factor for CHD.

VLDL Cholesterol Cal

14

 

mg/dL

5-40

 

LDL Cholesterol Calc

62

 

mg/dL

0-99

 

T. Chol/HDL Ratio

2.5

 

ratio units

0.0-5.0

 

Estimated CHD Risk

< 0.5

 

times avg.

0.0-1.0

 

T. Chol/HDL Ratio

 

 

 

 

 

  Men Women
1/2 Avg.Risk 3.4 3.3
Avg.Risk 5.0 4.4
2X Avg.Risk 9.6 7.1
3X Avg.Risk 23.4 11.0
 
 
       
         
         

The CHD Risk is based on the T. Chol/HDL ratio.  Other factors affect CHD Risk such as hypertension, smoking, diabetes, severe obesity, and family history of premature CHD

 

Tests

Results

 

Units

Reference Interval

Lab

CBC, Platelet Ct, and Diff

 

 

 

 

01

WBC

4.1

 

x10E3/uL

4.0-10.5

01

RBC

4.63

 

x10E6/uL

4.10-5.60

01

Hemoglobin

14.4

 

g/dL

12.5-17.0

01

Hematocrit

43.0

 

%

36.0-50.0

01

MCV

93

 

fL

80-98

01

MCH

31.1

 

pg

27.0-34.0

01

MCHC

33.5

 

g/dL

32.0-36.0

01

RDW

13.3

 

%

11.7-15.0

01

Platelets

166

 

x10E3/uL

140-415

01

Neutrophils

54

 

%

40-74

01

Lymphs

23

 

%

14-46

01

Monocytes

19

H

%

4-13

01

Eos

2

 

%

0-7

01

Basos

2

 

%

0-3

01

Neutrophils (Absolute)

2.3

 

x10E3/uL

1.8-7.8

01

Lymphs (Absolute)

0.9

 

x10E3/uL

0.7-4.5

01

Monocytes(Absolute)

0.8

 

x10E3/uL

0.1-1.0

01

Eos (Absolute)

0.1

 

x10E3/uL

0.0-0.4

01

Baso (Absolute)

0.1

 

x10E3/uL

0.0-0.2

01

Immature Granulocytes

0

 

%

0-1

01

Immature Grans (Abs)

0.0

 

x10E3/uL

0.0-0.1

01

PSA Total+% Free (Serial)

 

 

 

 

 

Prostate Specific Ag, Serum

0.6

 

ng/mL

0.0-4.0

01

Roche ECLIA methodology.

 

 

 

 

 

Testosterone, Free and Total

 

 

 

 

 

Testosterone, Serum

561

 

ng/dL

193-740

01

Free Testosterone (Direct)

20.0

 

pg/mL

7.2-24.0

02

Estradiol

 

 

 

 

 

Estradiol

43.8

H

pg/mL

7.6-42.6

01

Roche ECLIA methodology

 

 

 

 

 

Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate

 

 

 

 

 

DHEA-Sulfate

698.9

H

ug/dL

51.7-295.0

01

Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy

 

 

 

 

 

Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy

55.8

 

ng/mL

32.0-100.0

01

Recent studies consider the lower limit of 32.0 ng/mL to be a threshold for optimal health. Hollis BW. J Nutr. 2005 Feb;135(2):317-22.

C-Reactive Protein, Cardiac

 

 

 

 

 

C-Reactive Protein, Cardiac

0.22

 

mg/L

0.00-3.00

01

Relative Risk for Future Cardiovascular Event
Low <1.00
Average 1.00 - 3.00
High >3.00

Homocyst(e)ine, Plasma

 

 

 

 

 

Homocyst(e)ine, Plasma

10.0

 

umol/L

0.0-15.0

01

Insulin

6.2

 

uIU/mL

0.0-24.9

01

Sex Horm Binding Glob, Serum

35.8

 

nmol/L

14.5-48.4

01

Ferritin, Serum

26

L

ng/mL

30-400

01