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Abstracts

Life Extension Magazine October 2013
Abstracts

Fructose

Excessive fructose intake induces the features of metabolic syndrome in healthy adult men: role of uric acid in the hypertensive response.

BACKGROUND: Excessive fructose intake causes metabolic syndrome in animals and can be partially prevented by lowering the uric acid level. We tested the hypothesis that fructose might induce features of metabolic syndrome in adult men and whether this is protected by allopurinol. METHODS: A randomized, controlled trial of 74 adult men who were administered 200 g fructose daily for 2 weeks with or without allopurinol. Primary measures included changes in ambulatory blood pressure (BP), fasting lipids, glucose and insulin, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, body mass index and criteria for metabolic syndrome. RESULTS: The ingestion of fructose resulted in an increase in ambulatory BP (7+/-2 and 5+/-2 mm Hg for systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP), P<0.004 and P<0.007, respectively). Mean fasting triglycerides increased by 0.62+/-0.23 mmol l(-1) (55+/-20 mg per 100 ml), whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased by 0.06+/-0.02 mmol l(-1) (2.5+/-0.7 mg per 100 ml), P<0.002 and P<0.001, respectively. Fasting insulin and HOMA indices increased significantly, whereas plasma glucose level did not change. All liver function tests showed an increase in values. The metabolic syndrome increased by 25-33% depending on the criteria. Allopurinol lowered the serum uric acid level (P<0.0001) and prevented the increase in 24-h ambulatory DBP and daytime SBP and DBP. Allopurinol treatment did not reduce HOMA or fasting plasma triglyceride levels, but lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol relative to control (P<0.02) and also prevented the increase in newly diagnosed metabolic syndrome (0-2%, P=0.009). CONCLUSIONS: High doses of fructose raise the BP and cause the features of metabolic syndrome. Lowering the uric acid level prevents the increase in mean arterial blood pressure. Excessive intake of fructose may have a role in the current epidemics of obesity and diabetes.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Mar;34(3):454-61

Low-fructose diet lowers blood pressure and inflammation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

BACKGROUND: Fructose has been strongly linked with hypertension, hyperuricemia and inflammation in experimental models and humans. However, the effect of low-fructose diet on inflammation, hyperuricemia and the progression of renal disease has not yet been evaluated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients (age 59 ± 15 years, 17 males/11 females) with Stages 2 and 3 CKD were switched from a regular (basal) (60.0 g/24 h) to a low (12.0 g/24 h) fructose diet for 6 weeks, followed by a resumption of their regular diet for another 6 weeks. Diet was monitored by a dietician. At the baseline, low- and regular-fructose diet ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was measured and blood sampled for renal function (creatinine), inflammatory markers, fasting glucose and insulin and serum uric acid. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were also obtained for creatinine, uric acid, monocyte chemotatic protein-1, transforming growth factor-beta and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. RESULTS: The low-fructose diet tended to improve BP for the whole group (n = 28), while significant reduction of BP was only seen in dippers (n = 20) but not in non-dippers (n = 8). No effects on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or proteinuria were observed. Serum uric acid was lowered non-significantly with low-fructose diet (7.1 ± 1.3 versus 6.6 ± 1.0 mg/dL, P < 0.1), whereas a significant decrease in fasting serum insulin was observed (11.2 ± 6.1 versus 8.2 ± 2.9 mIU/mL, P < 0.05) and the reduction persisted after return to the regular diet. A slight but not significant reduction in urinary uric acid and fractional uric acid excretion was observed while the patients were on the low fructose diet. The low-fructose diet also decreased high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (4.3 ± 4.9 versus 3.3 ± 4.5 mg/L; P < 0.01) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) (250.9 ± 59.4 versus 227 ± 50.5 ng/mL; P < 0.05). The hsCRP returned to baseline with resumption of the regular diet, whereas the reduction in sICAM persisted. CONCLUSION: Low-fructose diet in subjects with CKD can reduce inflammation with some potential benefits on BP. This pilot study needs to be confirmed by a larger clinical trial to determine the long-term benefit of a low-fructose diet compared to other diets in subjects with CKD.

Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Feb;27(2):608-12

High-fructose corn syrup causes vascular dysfunction associated with metabolic disturbance in rats: protective effect of resveratrol.

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is used in many prepared foods and soft drinks. However, limited data is available on the consequences of HFCS consumption on metabolic and cardiovascular functions. This study was, therefore, designed to assess whether HFCS drinking influences the endothelial and vascular function in association with metabolic disturbances in rats. Additionally, resveratrol was tested at challenge with HFCS. We investigated the effects of HFCS (10 and 20%) and resveratrol (50 mg/l) beverages on several metabolic parameters as well as endothelial relaxation, vascular contractions, expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins and superoxide generation in the aortas. Consumption of HFCS (20%) increased serum triglyceride, VLDL and insulin levels as well as blood pressure. Impaired relaxation to acetylcholine and intensified contractions to phenylephrine and angiotensin II were associated with decreased eNOS and SIRT1 whereas increased gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins, along with provoked superoxide production in the aortas from HFCS-treated rats. Resveratrol supplementation efficiently restored HFCS-induced deteriorations. Thus, intake of HFCS leads to vascular dysfunction by decreasing vasoprotective factors and provoking oxidative stress in association with metabolic disturbances. Resveratrol has a protective potential against the harmful consequences of HFCS consumption.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2012 Jun;50(6):2135-41

Adverse metabolic effects of dietary fructose: results from the recent epidemiological, clinical, and mechanistic studies.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The effects of dietary sugar on risk factors and the processes associated with metabolic disease remain a controversial topic, with recent reviews of the available evidence arriving at widely discrepant conclusions. RECENT FINDINGS: There are many recently published epidemiological studies that provide evidence that sugar consumption is associated with metabolic disease. Three recent clinical studies, which investigated the effects of consuming relevant doses of sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup along with ad libitum diets, provide evidence that consumption of these sugars increase the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Mechanistic studies suggest that these effects result from the rapid hepatic metabolism of fructose catalyzed by fructokinase C, which generates substrate for de novo lipogenesis and leads to increased uric acid levels. Recent clinical studies investigating the effects of consuming less sugar, via educational interventions or by substitution of sugar-sweetened beverages for noncalorically sweetened beverages, provide evidence that such strategies have beneficial effects on risk factors for metabolic disease or on BMI in children. SUMMARY: The accumulating epidemiological evidence, direct clinical evidence, and the evidence suggesting plausible mechanisms support a role for sugar in the epidemics of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and type II diabetes.

Curr Opin Lipidol. 2013 Jun;24(3):198-206

Is the metabolic syndrome caused by a high fructose, and relatively low fat, low cholesterol diet?

The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is manifested by a lipid triad which includes elevated serum triglycerides, small LDL particles, and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, by central obesity (central adiposity), insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and elevated blood pressure, and it is associated with an increased risk of type II diabetes and coronary heart disease. We have developed a new hypothesis regarding MetS as a consequence of a high intake in carbohydrates and food with a high glycemic index, particularly fructose, and relatively low intake of cholesterol and saturated fat. We support our arguments through animal studies which have shown that exposure of the liver to increased quantities of fructose leads to rapid stimulation of lipogenesis and accumulation of triglycerides. The adipocytes store triglycerides in lipid droplets, leading to adipocyte hypertrophy. Adipocyte hypertrophy is associated with macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue. An important modulator of obesity-associated macrophage responses in white adipose tissue is the death of adipocytes. Excess exposure to fructose intake determines the liver to metabolize high doses of fructose, producing increased levels of fructose end products, like glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone phosphate, that can converge with the glycolytic pathway. Fructose also leads to increased levels of advanced glycation end products. The macrophages exposed to advanced glycation end products become dysfunctional and, on entry into the artery wall, contribute to plaque formation and thrombosis.

Arch Med Sci. 2011 Feb;7(1):8-20

Dietary fructose and risk of metabolic syndrome in adults: Tehran Lipid and Glucose study.

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that the excessive fructose intake may induce adverse metabolic effects. There is no direct evidence from epidemiological studies to clarify the association between usual amounts of fructose intake and the metabolic syndrome. OBJECTIVE: The aim this study was to determine the association of fructose intake and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in Tehranian adults. METHODS: This cross-sectional population based study was conducted on 2,537 subjects (45% men) aged 19-70 y, participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (2006-2008). Dietary data were collected using a validated 168 item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Dietary fructose intake was calculated by sum of natural fructose (NF) in fruits and vegetables and added fructose (AF) in commercial foods. MetS was defined according to the modified NCEP ATP III for Iranian adults. RESULTS: The mean ages of men and women were 40.5 ± 13.6 and 38.6 ± 12.8 years, respectively. Mean total dietary fructose intakes were 46.5 ± 24.5 (NF: 19.6 ± 10.7 and AF: 26.9 ± 13.9) and 37.3 ± 24.2 g/d (NF: 18.6 ± 10.5 and AF: 18.7 ± 13.6) in men and women, respectively. Compared with those in the lowest quartile of fructose intakes, men and women in the highest quartile, respectively, had 33% (95% CI, 1.15-1.47) and 20% (95% CI, 1.09-1.27) higher risk of the metabolic syndrome; 39% (CI, 1.16-1.63) and 20% (CI, 1.07-1.27) higher risk of abdominal obesity; 11% (CI, 1.02-1.17) and 9% (CI, 1.02-1.14) higher risk of hypertension; and 9% (CI, 1-1.15) and 9% (1.04-1.12) higher risk of impaired fasting glucose. CONCLUSION: Higher consumption of dietary fructose may have adverse metabolic effects.

Nutr Metab (Lond). 2011 Jul 12;8(1):50

Effects of fructose vs glucose on regional cerebral blood flow in brain regions involved with appetite and reward pathways.

IMPORTANCE: Increases in fructose consumption have paralleled the increasing prevalence of obesity, and high-fructose diets are thought to promote weight gain and insulin resistance. Fructose ingestion produces smaller increases in circulating satiety hormones compared with glucose ingestion, and central administration of fructose provokes feeding in rodents, whereas centrally administered glucose promotes satiety. OBJECTIVE: To study neurophysiological factors that might underlie associations between fructose consumption and weight gain. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Twenty healthy adult volunteers underwent 2 magnetic resonance imaging sessions at Yale University in conjunction with fructose or glucose drink ingestion in a blinded, random-order, crossover design. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relative changes in hypothalamic regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) after glucose or fructose ingestion. Secondary outcomes included whole-brain analyses to explore regional CBF changes, functional connectivity analysis to investigate correlations between the hypothalamus and other brain region responses, and hormone responses to fructose and glucose ingestion. RESULTS: There was a significantly greater reduction in hypothalamic CBF after glucose vs fructose ingestion (-5.45 vs 2.84 mL/g per minute, respectively; mean difference, 8.3 mL/g per minute [95% CI of mean difference, 1.87-14.70]; P = .01). Glucose ingestion (compared with baseline) increased functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and the thalamus and striatum. Fructose increased connectivity between the hypothalamus and thalamus but not the striatum. Regional CBF within the hypothalamus, thalamus, insula, anterior cingulate, and striatum (appetite and reward regions) was reduced after glucose ingestion compared with baseline (P < .05 significance threshold, family-wise error [FWE] whole-brain corrected). In contrast, fructose reduced regional CBF in the thalamus, hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, fusiform, and visual cortex (P < .05 significance threshold, FWE whole-brain corrected). In whole-brain voxel-level analyses, there were no significant differences between direct comparisons of fructose vs glucose sessions following correction for multiple comparisons. Fructose vs glucose ingestion resulted in lower peak levels of serum glucose (mean difference, 41.0 mg/dL [95% CI, 27.7-54.5]; P < .001), insulin (mean difference, 49.6 µU/mL [95% CI, 38.2-61.1]; P < .001), and glucagon-like polypeptide 1 (mean difference, 2.1 pmol/L [95% CI, 0.9-3.2]; P = .01). CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: In a series of exploratory analyses, consumption of fructose compared with glucose resulted in a distinct pattern of regional CBF and a smaller increase in systemic glucose, insulin, and glucagon-like polypeptide 1 levels.

JAMA. 2013 Jan 2;309(1):63-70

Fructose-induced hypothalamic AMPK activation stimulates hepatic PEPCK and gluconeogenesis due to increased corticosterone levels.

Fructose consumption causes insulin resistance and favors hepatic gluconeogenesis through mechanisms that are not completely understood. Recent studies demonstrated that the activation of hypothalamic 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls dynamic fluctuations in hepatic glucose production. Thus, the present study was designed to investigate whether hypothalamic AMPK activation by fructose would mediate increased gluconeogenesis. Both ip and intracerebroventricular (icv) fructose treatment stimulated hypothalamic AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation, in parallel with increased hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxy kinase (PEPCK) and gluconeogenesis. An increase in AMPK phosphorylation by icv fructose was observed in the lateral hypothalamus as well as in the paraventricular nucleus and the arcuate nucleus. These effects were mimicked by icv 5-amino-imidazole-4-carboxamide-1-b-d-ribofuranoside treatment. Hypothalamic AMPK inhibition with icv injection of compound C or with injection of a small interfering RNA targeted to AMPKa2 in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) suppressed the hepatic effects of ip fructose. We also found that fructose increased corticosterone levels through a mechanism that is dependent on hypothalamic AMPK activation. Concomitantly, fructose-stimulated gluconeogenesis, hepatic PEPCK expression, and glucocorticoid receptor binding to the PEPCK gene were suppressed by pharmacological glucocorticoid receptor blockage. Altogether the data presented herein support the hypothesis that fructose-induced hypothalamic AMPK activation stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis by increasing corticosterone levels.

Endocrinology. 2012 Aug;153(8):3633-45

Changes induced by a fructose-rich diet on hepatic metabolism and the antioxidant system.

AIMS: The effect of a three-week fructose-rich diet (FRD) upon gene expression, protein and activity levels of liver antioxidant system and carbohydrate metabolism was studied. MAIN METHODS: Serum glucose (fasting and after a glucose load), triglyceride and insulin levels of normal male Wistar rats were measured. In liver, we measured gene/protein expression and enzyme activity of catalase (CAT), copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx); reduced glutathione (GSH); protein carbonyl content; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content and microsomal membrane susceptibility to lipid peroxidation; glucokinase (GK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) activity; and glycogen, pyruvate, lactate and triglyceride content. KEY FINDINGS: Similar body weights and caloric intake were recorded in both groups. FRD rats had higher serum glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels, molar insulin:glucose ratio, HOMA-IR values and impaired glucose tolerance, whereas CAT, CuZnSOD and GSHPx relative gene expression levels were significantly lower. CAT and CuZnSOD protein expression, CAT activity and GSH content were also lower, while protein carbonyl content was higher. No differences were recorded in CuZnSOD, MnSOD and GSHPx activity, TBARS content and membrane susceptibility to lipid peroxidation. Glycogen, lactate and triglyceride content and GK, G-6-Pase and G-6-PDH activity were significantly higher in FRD rats. SIGNIFICANCE: In the presence of oxidative stress, the liver exhibits changes in the carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways that would decrease reactive oxygen species production and their deleterious effect, thus inducing little impact on specific antioxidant mechanisms. This knowledge could facilitate the design and implementation of strategies to prevent oxidative stress-induced liver damage.

Life Sci. 2010 Jun 19;86(25-26):965-71

Consumption of fructose and high fructose corn syrup increase postprandial triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, and apolipoprotein-B in young men and women.

CONTEXT: The American Heart Association Nutrition Committee recommends women and men consume no more than 100 and 150 kcal of added sugar per day, respectively, whereas the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, suggests a maximal added sugar intake of 25% or less of total energy. OBJECTIVE: To address this discrepancy, we compared the effects of consuming glucose, fructose, or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) at 25% of energy requirements (E) on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PARTICIPANTS, DESIGN AND SETTING, AND INTERVENTION: Forty-eight adults (aged 18-40 yr; body mass index 18-35 kg/m(2)) resided at the Clinical Research Center for 3.5 d of baseline testing while consuming energy-balanced diets containing 55% E complex carbohydrate. For 12 outpatient days, they consumed usual ad libitum diets along with three servings per day of glucose, fructose, or HFCS-sweetened beverages (n = 16/group), which provided 25% E requirements. Subjects then consumed energy-balanced diets containing 25% E sugar-sweetened beverages/30% E complex carbohydrate during 3.5 d of inpatient intervention testing. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Twenty-four-hour triglyceride area under the curve, fasting plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and apolipoprotein B (apoB) concentrations were measured. RESULTS: Twenty-four-hour triglyceride area under the curve was increased compared with baseline during consumption of fructose (+4.7 ± 1.2 mmol/liter × 24 h, P = 0.0032) and HFCS (+1.8 ± 1.4 mmol/liter × 24 h, P = 0.035) but not glucose (-1.9 ± 0.9 mmol/liter × 24 h, P = 0.14). Fasting LDL and apoB concentrations were increased during consumption of fructose (LDL: +0.29 ± 0.082 mmol/liter, P = 0.0023; apoB: +0.093 ± 0.022 g/liter, P = 0.0005) and HFCS (LDL: +0.42 ± 0.11 mmol/liter, P < 0.0001; apoB: +0.12 ± 0.031 g/liter, P < 0.0001) but not glucose (LDL: +0.012 ± 0.071 mmol/liter, P = 0.86; apoB: +0.0097 ± 0.019 g/liter, P = 0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of HFCS-sweetened beverages for 2 wk at 25% E increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease comparably with fructose and more than glucose in young adults.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Oct;96(10):E1596-605