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Ophthalmologists Advise Seniors to be Aware of the Dangers of Ignoring Cataracts Symptoms


PRNewswire

08-01-13

Delaying Treatment of Advanced Forms of the Common Eye Disease Can Increase Risk of Permanent Blindness and Injury SAN FRANCISCO, July 30, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- In support of Cataract Awareness Month in August, the American Academy of Ophthalmology is urging seniors and their caregivers to be aware of the dangers of ignoring the symptoms of cataracts, a leading cause of visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old[1]. Delaying diagnosis and treatment of age-related cataracts can increase seniors' risk of permanent blindness and can lead to both physical and psychological damage[2].

Cataracts are caused by the clouding of the lens of the eye and are most common among older adults as the condition develops as the eye ages. Many seniors cope with cataracts - accepting vision loss as an inevitable part of the aging process rather than seeking medical treatment. Due to the incapacitation caused by blurred vision, leaving cataracts undiagnosed and untreated can lead to physical danger such as injuries from falls or running into unseen objects, as well as psychological harm like depression and social isolation[3]. In addition, the longer advanced forms of cataracts are left untreated, the more difficult it can be to successfully repair the damage caused to the eye[4].

Adults age 65 and older should have regular eye exams to monitor for the development of cataracts, in addition to other common eye conditions and diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma. People with diabetes, a family history of cataracts, and those who smoke tobacco are at an increased risk of developing cataracts. Common symptoms such as dull, blurry vision, colors appearing less vibrant, and halos around lights, may begin to be noticeable as cataracts develop. This cataract simulator demonstrates how vision is affected by cataracts.

Cataracts are nearly always treatable with surgery, but it may not be necessary until performing daily activities becomes difficult. If daily life isn't disturbed, a change in a person's eyeglass prescription may be all that is necessary until visual impairment becomes more severe. If completing everyday tasks is challenging, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist - a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

"Seniors who find themselves giving up normal tasks like reading, exercising or driving due to cataract symptoms should know that they do no not need to suffer in silence," said Rebecca Taylor, M.D., spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. "Cataract surgery can help these individuals regain their sight and their independence. It is one of the most common and safest procedures performed in medicine, so seniors should not resist seeking help. Getting treatment can vastly improve your quality of life."

For people without regular access to eye care or for whom cost is a concern, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, offers eye exams and care at no out of pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc., with additional support from Alcon and Genentech.

For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world's largest association of eye physicians and surgeons -- Eye M.D.s -- with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three "O's" - ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy's EyeSmart(R) program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos(TM) is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

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[1] Prevent Blindness America, Vision Problems in the U.S. Report, June 2012. Accessed at http://www.visionproblemsus.org/.

[2] American Academy of Ophthalmology Cataract and Anterior Segment Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern(R) Guidelines. Cataract in the Adult Eye, p 10. San Francisco, CA: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2011.www.aao.org/ppp.

[3] American Academy of Ophthalmology Cataract and Anterior Segment Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern(R) Guidelines. Cataract in the Adult Eye, p 10. San Francisco, CA: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2011.www.aao.org/ppp.

[4] Community Eye Health. 2008 March; 21(65): 12-14. Accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2377383/#__ffn_sectitle

Image with caption: "Adults age 65 and older should have regular eye exams with an ophthalmologist - a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions - to monitor for the development of cataracts." Image available at: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130730/MM55636

Image with caption: "American Academy of Ophthalmology Logo." Image available at: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130405/MM89329LOGO

SOURCE American Academy of Ophthalmology

Copyright PRNewswire 2013

Articles featured in Life Extension Daily News are derived from a variety of news sources and are provided as a service by Life Extension. These articles, while of potential interest to readers of Life Extension Daily News, do not necessarily represent the opinions nor constitute the advice of Life Extension.

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