Daily News: Nutrition

Recent Findings from University of Michigan Provide New Insights into Inflammation (Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the...

Health & Medicine Week

07-23-14

Recent Findings from University of Michigan Provide New Insights into Inflammation (Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- A new study on Inflammation is now available. According to news originating from Ann Arbor, Michigan, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Michigan, "We used data from the 2003-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet?s role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level."

For more information on this research see: Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. Environmental Research, 2014;131():6-12. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Environmental Research - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/622821)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from J.A. Colacino, Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 6630 SPH Tower, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. Additional authors for this research include A.E. Arthur, K.K. Ferguson and L.S Rozek (see also Inflammation).

Keywords for this news article include: Antioxidants, Cadmium, Michigan, Ann Arbor, Inflammation, United States, Protective Agents, Transition Elements, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC

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