Daily News: Aging

Findings from H.J. Shao et al Update Understanding of Alzheimer Disease (Chronic Treatment with Anesthetic Propofol Improves Cognitive Function and...

Health & Medicine Week

07-24-14

Findings from H.J. Shao et al Update Understanding of Alzheimer Disease (Chronic Treatment with Anesthetic Propofol Improves Cognitive Function and Attenuates Caspase Activation in Both Aged and Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- New research on Neurodegenerative Diseases is the subject of a report. According to news reporting out of Bedford, Massachusetts, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "There is a need to seek new treatment(s) for Alzheimer's disease (AD). A recent study showed that AD patients may have decreased levels of functional GABA receptors."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research, "Propofol, a commonly used anesthetic, is a GABA receptor agonist. We therefore set out to perform a proof of concept study to determine whether chronic treatment with propofol (50 mg/kg/week) can improve cognitive function in both aged wild-type (WT) and AD transgenic (Tg) mice. Propofol was administrated to the WT and AD Tg mice once a week for 8 or 12 weeks, respectively. Morris water maze was used to assess the cognitive function of the mice following the propofol treatment. Activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspase-8 was investigated using western blot analysis at the end of the propofol treatment. In the mechanistic studies, effects of propofol, amyloid-beta protein (A beta), and GABA receptor antagonist flumazenil on caspase-3 activation and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore were assessed in H4 human neuroglioma and mouse neuroblastoma cells by western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Here we showed that the propofol treatment improved cognitive function and attenuated brain caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation in both aged WT and AD Tg mice. Propofol attenuated A beta-induced caspase-3 activation and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the cells, and flumazenil inhibited the propofol's effects."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These results suggested that propofol might improve cognitive function via attenuating the A beta-induced mitochondria dysfunction and caspase activation, which explored the potential that anesthetic propofol could improve cognitive function in elderly and AD patients."

For more information on this research see: Chronic Treatment with Anesthetic Propofol Improves Cognitive Function and Attenuates Caspase Activation in Both Aged and Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice. Journal of Alzheimers Disease, 2014;41(2):499-513. Journal of Alzheimers Disease can be contacted at: Ios Press, Nieuwe Hemweg 6B, 1013 Bg Amsterdam, Netherlands (see also Neurodegenerative Diseases).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting H.J. Shao, Geriatr Res Educ & Clin Center, Bedford, MA, United States. Additional authors for this research include Y.Y. Zhang, Y.L. Dong, B.W. Yu, W.M. Xia and Z.C. Xie.

Keywords for this news article include: Bedford, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America, Alzheimer Disease, Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins, Brain Diseases, Central Nervous System Diseases, Cysteine Endopeptidases, Cysteine Proteases, Dementia, Effector Caspases, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Peptide Hydrolases, Peptides, Tauopathies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC

Articles featured in Life Extension Daily News are derived from a variety of news sources and are provided as a service by Life Extension. These articles, while of potential interest to readers of Life Extension Daily News, do not necessarily represent the opinions nor constitute the advice of Life Extension.