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Life Extension Update

October 1, 2005 Printer Friendly
In this issue
 

Life Extension Update Exclusive

   

“What We Eat in America” - and what we don't

 

Protocol

   

Prevention

 

Featured Products

   

Super Booster Softgels

   

Magnesium Capsules

 

Life Extension Magazine

   

October 2005 issue now online!

Life Extension Update Exclusive

“What We Eat in America” - and what we don't

A report entitled “What We Eat in America, NHANES 2001-2002,” released this month by the Agricultural Research Service's Food Surveys Research Group in Beltsville, Maryland, reveals that Americans are deficient in a number of required nutrients, particularly vitamin E. The report is the latest compilation of data obtained from the dietary interview component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for 2001-2002. Dietary (not including supplemental) intake of 24 nutrients was calculated for 8,940 participants age one and older via 24 hour dietary recall surveys in 2001 and 2002. The average values were compared with the Institute of Medicine's Dietary Reference Intakes for children, men and women in established age categories.

When the estimated usual intakes of the subjects were compared to the Institute of Medicine's Estimated Average Requirements, which are the average daily nutrient intakes estimated to meet the needs of half of the healthy individuals in a given population group, the participants were found to be deficient in a number of nutrients. A deficiency of vitamin E was the most striking finding, with 93 percent of Americans estimated to consume inadequate amounts of the vitamin (if the dietary habits of the participants in this study can be agreed upon as accurately reflecting those of the general population). Not surprisingly, magnesium came in second, with 56 percent of the population estimated to be deficient. Deficiencies of vitamin A were estimated to affect 44 percent of Americans, of vitamin C, 31 percent; of vitamin B6, 14 percent; and zinc deficiencies were estimated to exist in 12 percent. Folate, copper, phosphorus, thiamin (vitamin B1) iron and protein were found to be lacking in females aged 9 and older.

The findings of the survey are disturbing given that many consider the Dietary Reference Intakes as already too low to ensure good health. Interesting amid the current media-bashing of vitamin E was the finding that intake of the vitamin is insufficient among most Americans. The report's findings stand in sharp contrast with the too-often-heard statement that one can obtain all of one's vitamin needs from one's diet.

Protocol

Prevention

The Foundation's Prevention protocols consist of the 10 most important supplements for the average person to take every day to reduce risk of contracting the degenerative diseases of aging.

The following recommendations are listed in order of importance:

Life Extension Mix
Super Booster
Coenzyme Q10
Mitochondrial Energy Optimizer
Cognitex
Super EPA/DHA with Sesame Lignans and Olive Fruit Extract
Enhanced Natural Prostate with Cernitin
Bone Restore
Restoring youthful hormone balance
S-adenosyl-methionine
Aspirin

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-131.shtml

Featured Products

Super Booster Softgels

One or more members of the vitamin E family may:

Just one softgel capsule of Life Extension Super Booster provides important nutrients such as gamma tocopherol that are lacking in multinutrient formulas. The latest version of Super Booster provides sesame lignans to enhance the dissemination of gamma tocopherol to cells throughout the body.

In human and animal studies, administration of sesame lignans increases tissue and serum levels of gamma and alph- tocopherol. This is critical because gamma-tocopherol, but not alpha-tocopherol, quenches reactive nitrogen species, such as the dangerous peroxynitrite radical. Studies have shown that adding sesame to a rat diet reduced a measurement of free-radical damage by 82.8%. A human study conducted by Life Extension showed that the combination of gamma-tocopherol and sesame was 25% more effective in suppressing blood markers of free-radical damage and inflammation compared to gamma- tocopherol and tocotrienols.

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00780.html

Magnesium Capsules

Many Americans do not obtain adequate amounts of magnesium in their diets. Magnesium is so inexpensive that everyone should consider supplementing at least 500 mg of magnesium daily.

 

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00264.html

Life Extension Magazine

October 2005 issue now online

Reports

 

On the cover: Why our arteries become clogged as we age, by John Colman

 

Preserving and restoring brain function, by Dale Kiefer

 

Coenzyme Q10: New applications for cancer therapy, by Christine Yerby, ND

 

Are fish oil supplements safer than eating fish? By Debra Fulghum Bruce, PhD

 

Topical use of tea benefits skin health, by Gary Goldfaden, MD

Departments

 

As we see it:
Just say no to x-rays!
By William Faloon

 

In the news:
Green tea extract helps prevent prostate cancer, Melatonin may protect against cell phone radiation, Bromelain reduces bowel inflammation, Fish oil enhances heart rate variability, DHEA improves insulin response, Blood vessel drugs once called failures halt cancer growth

 

Case history:
Integrative management of erectile dysfunction
, by Dr. Sergey A. Dzugan

 

Profile
Amy Pomykal: A Spirited Struggle to Survive Brain Cancer
, by Sue Kovach

 

October 2005 abstracts
Peak ATP, omega-3 fish oil, erectile dysfunction

Questions? Comments? Send them to ddye@lifeextension.com or call 954 202 7716.

For longer life,

Dayna Dye
Editor, Life Extension Update
ddye@lifeextension.com
954 766 8433 extension 7716

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