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Life Extension Update

February 11, 2006 Printer Friendly
In this issue
 

Life Extension Update Exclusive

   

Vitamin D antimetastasis mechanism reported

 

Protocol

   

Prostate cancer adjuvant therapy

 

Featured Products

   

Vitamin D Capsules

   

Mega Green Tea Extract Capsules

 

What's Hot

   

Soy and cruciferous vegetables enhance DNA repair

Life Extension Update Exclusive

 

Vitamin D antimetastasis mechanism reported

The January 2006 issue of the journal Carcinogenesis reported the findings of researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center that vitamin D helps prevent the spread of prostate cancer cells by limiting the activity of two enzymes. Prior research has shown that vitamin D suppresses cancer progression, but its mechanisms were unclear. "We wanted to know the targets of vitamin D so we would know which patients would respond better," explained lead researcher and University of Rochester assistant professor of Urology Yi-Fen Lee, PhD.

Dr Lee and colleagues studied the effect of 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D3, the active form of vitamin D in the body, on three different prostate cancer cell lines. They examined three groups of proteases (enzymes that break down protein) involved in tumor invasion: the matrix metalloproteinases, the plasminogen activators, and the cathepsins. They found that treatment with vitamin D decreased the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the cathepsins, but not the plasminogen activators. Simultaneously, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and cathepsin inhibitors were found to have an increase in their activity.

The finding will prove particularly useful for individuals who have high levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cathepsin activity. "Each individual is different so the therapy could be custom made for each person," Dr Lee remarked.

Dr Lee is currently investigating whether pharmaceutical agents or other vitamins, such as vitamin E, could enhance the anticancer benefits of vitamin D. She stated, "The best way to get vitamin D is to drink milk, get modest exposure to the sun, and take a vitamin pill to enrich the vitamin D, which might prevent cancer."

Protocol

Prostate cancer adjuvant therapy

Genistein has been proposed as an effective agent to prevent the expression of metastatic capacity in hormone dependent cancers. In a cell-culture system, genistein appeared to be cytotoxic and inhibitory of PC cell proliferation (Geller et al., Prostate, 1998). Genistein and soy products therefore play a potential major role in established PC. Cancer cells use the enzyme tyrosine kinase as a growth factor. Soy genistein is a potent inhibitor of tyrosine kinase activity. The effects of protein kinase inhibitors on human prostate cell growth have been extensively investigated.

Other adjunctive therapies known to have an effect on PC include the use of vitamin D. Published studies using more potent synthetic vitamin D analogs such as Rocaltrol or Calcitriol have shown a slowing effect on PC growth (Gross et al., J. Urol., 1998). These analogs affect the p27Kip1 oncogene that results in over-expression of enzymes that inhibit part of the tumor cell cycle (Koike et al., Proc. Annu. Meet. Am. Assoc. Cancer Res., 1997). In short, synthetic vitamin D analogs cause a G1 arrest in the cell cycle by over-expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs).

The inhibition of new blood vessel formation to block the growth and spread of PC is currently under investigation. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is known to have this antiangiogenesis effect as well as genistein. Other agents that have an effect on cancer cell invasiveness include green tea polyphenols. Green and black tea are derived from the same plant, Camellia sinensis. However, only green tea is rich in the flavonol group of polyphenols known as catechins. The fermentation process used in making black tea destroys the biologically active polyphenols of the fresh leaf. The catechins as a group have significant free radical scavenging ability and are potent antioxidants. Four catechins are found in green tea leaves:

  • epicatechin (EC)
  • epigallocatechin (EGC)
  • epicatechin gallate (ECG)
  • epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)

Of these four factions EGCG is the most important to the PC patient.

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-134.shtml

Featured Products

Vitamin D capsules

Vitamin D is necessary for utilization of calcium and phosphorus and in many ways acts as a hormone. The two most important forms of vitamin D are cholecalciferol (D3), which is derived from our own cholesterol and ergocalciferol (D2), a plant analogue derived from the diet. The cholecalciferol supplied by the Life Extension Buyers Club is synthetic, but its form is identical to that which is derived from cholesterol and synthesized by sunlight on the skin. Cholecalciferol Vitamin D is essential for bone growth and maintenance of bone density.

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00251.html

Mega Green Tea Extract Capsules

Mega Green Tea Extract capsules contain an unprecedented 725 mg of either lightly caffeinated or decaffeinated 93% standardized green tea extracts, which makes it easy to obtain super-potent doses by taking only one of these low-cost capsules per day. Each Mega Green Tea Extract capsule provides 246.5 mg of EGCG…about ten times more than what is being put into commercial multivitamin supplements today.

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00753.html

What's Hot

Soy and cruciferous vegetables enhance DNA repair

The February 13, 2006 issue of the British Journal of Cancer reported the findings of researchers at Georgetown University 's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center that genistein and indole-3-carbinol, found in soy and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, enhance DNA repair. The finding could explain, in part, the protective effect these compounds have been shown to provide against some cancers.

http://www.lef.org/whatshot/index.html#sacv

If you have questions or comments concerning this issue or past issues of Life Extension Update, send them to ddye@lifeextension.com or call 954 202 7716.

For longer life,

Dayna Dye
Editor, Life Extension Update
ddye@lifeextension.com
954 766 8433 extension 7716

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