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Life Extension Update

August 22, 2006 Printer Friendly
In this issue
 

Life Extension Update Exclusive

   

Supercentenarians—who are they?

 

Health Concern

   

Coronary artery disease

 

Featured Products

   

Homocysteine Resist

   

Peak ATP™ with GlycoCarn™

 

Life Extension magazine, August 2006

   

Jack LaLanne, "Godfather of Fitness" still going strong at 91, by Dave Tuttle

Life Extension Update Exclusive

Supercentenarians—who are they?

Living to be 100 isn’t as rare as it used to be.  It is now supercentenarians—individuals aged 110 and older--who are making headlines.  In the August, 2006 issue of The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Thomas T Perls, MD, MPH of Boston University Medical Center and colleagues report the health characteristics of these long lived individuals, and reveal that a surprisingly substantial portion were still functioning independently at the time of the study.

Dr Perls’ team analyzed 32 individuals between the ages of 110 and 119 who make up half of the supercentenarians living in the United States.  Twenty-seven of the participants were women.  The 119 year old participant was the oldest documented living person in the world at the time of enrollment.

Five subjects were able to function independently, 8 with minimal assistance, and 6 with partial assistance.  Thirteen were classified as very or totally dependent.  One-fourth of the subjects had a history of cancer, all of whom were cured.  Only one participant was diabetic and one had Parkinson’s disease.  Osteoporosis was more common, with 44 percent suffering from the disease, and the majority of the group had experienced cataracts.  A predominant feature was the near-absence of vascular disease.  Only two participants had a history of heart attack, and four had had strokes.  Seven were taking antihypertensive drugs.

The authors observed that the onset of functional decline and age-related disease is delayed among centenarians, and hypothesized that the same delay must be extended at least to the age of 100 to enable a person to reach supercentenarian status.  “By virtue of their likely ability to markedly delay or escape age-related illnesses and frailty and their probable sharing of traits that enable such exceptional survival, supercentenarians are likely to be an important resource for discovering environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors that predispose to longevity and decreased susceptibility to vascular and other lethal diseases associated with aging,” they conclude.

Health Concern

Coronary artery disease

Atherosclerosis is perhaps the single most deadly disease in the United States, yet there is a good chance that most people, even those at high risk for heart disease, don’t really understand how it develops. The fact is, long before any symptoms are clinically evident, atherosclerosis begins as a malfunction of specialized cells that line our arteries. Called endothelial cells, they are the key to atherosclerosis, and underlying endothelial dysfunction is the central feature of this dreaded disease.

The treatment of atherosclerosis depends on the stage of the disease. Severe disease, in which an artery has significant blockage or unstable plaque deposits, may require intensive care. In most cases, however, less severe disease is treated with a combination of lifestyle changes (including dietary changes) and medication. The following dietary and lifestyle changes have been shown to slow, or even reverse, the effects of atherosclerosis:

  • Reduce dietary saturated fats, cholesterol, and trans-fatty acids.
  • Increase intake of fiber to at least 10 g daily.
  • Consume at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily.
  • Ensure adequate intake of folic acid (400 to 1000 mg daily) to reduce homocysteine levels.
  • For obese people, lower weight and increase physical activity to reduce the risk factors for metabolic syndrome and to help control blood pressure and reduce cardiac workload.
  • For people with hypertension, limit sodium intake and maintain adequate intake of potassium, calcium, and magnesium.
  • Stop smoking. This is essential.

http://www.lef.org/protocols/heart_circulatory/coronary_artery_disease_atherosclerosis_01.htm

Featured Products

Homocysteine Resist

Life Extension has long warned members about the dangers of high homocysteine and has advised taking vitamin B6, folic acid, and vitamin B12 to help maintain healthy arteries.

While many doctors and blood laboratories consider homocysteine levels of 5-15 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) blood to be “normal,” epidemiologic data indicate that levels above 6.3 mmol/L sharply and progressively increase heart problems.   One study found that each 3 mmol/L increase in homocysteine caused a 35 percent increase in heart problems.  Because there is no “safe” level of homocysteine, Life Extension recommends keeping levels as low as possible, preferably below 7-8 mmol/L.

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00800.html

Peak ATP™ with GlycoCarn™

The endothelium is the thin barrier that separates circulating blood from the smooth muscle interior of the artery. Healthy endothelial cells help to maintain a normal cardiovascular system. Aging, poor lifestyle habits and nutrition can lead to endothelial problems.

Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) plays an important role in protecting the function and health of endothelial cells. PLC passes across the mitochondrial membrane to supply carnitine directly to the energy-producing organelles of all cells. Carnitine is essential for mitochondrial fatty acid transport and energy production. This is important because endothelial cells burn fatty acids for 70 percent of their energy.

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00881.html

Life Extension magazine August, 2006

Jack LaLanne, "Godfather of Fitness" still going strong at 91, by Dave Tuttle

Often referred to as the “Godfather of Fitness,” Jack is not only one of America’s original exercise and nutrition gurus, but also a successful businessman, celebrity, lecturer, and motivational speaker. He has published books and made videos on fitness and nutrition, appeared in films, and recorded songs. Now approaching his 92nd birthday, this American icon remains the picture of health and well-being.

“You control your life,” he says. “My dad died at 50, but your genetics don’t control your longevity. Do the things that are under your control. Man can live to be 150. Common diseases like diabetes can be controlled by diet and exercise. Stay away from animal fats and processed foods. Read every food label, and if you can’t pronounce the ingredients, don’t buy it. Buying nutrient-empty foods is like putting water in the gas tank of your car. But good food by itself is not enough. You need a healthy lifestyle as well.”

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2006/aug2006_report_lalanne_01.htm

Questions?  Comments?  Send them to ddye@lifeextension.com or call 954 202 7716.

For longer life,

Dayna Dye
Editor, Life Extension Update
ddye@lifeextension.com
954 766 8433 extension 7716
www.lef.org

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