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Life Extension Update

November 11, 2006 Printer Friendly
In this issue

Life Extension Update Exclusive

Higher vitamin E levels associated with lower mortality in men over 19 year period

Health Concern

Lung Cancer

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Super Selenium Complex

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Life Extension Update Exclusive

Higher vitamin E levels associated with lower mortality in men over 19 year period

The results of a large study of older male smokers, published in the November, 2006 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, revealed that having higher blood levels of vitamin E is associated with a reduced risk of dying from all causes as well as specific causes including cardiovascular disease and cancer during a 19 year follow-up period.

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, in collaboration with the National Public Health Institute in Helsinki, Finland, evaluated data from participants in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study, which enrolled 29,133 male smokers aged 50 to 69 who resided in Finland. Blood samples collected from 29,092 participants upon enrollment were analyzed for alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), beta-carotene, retinol, and cholesterol levels.

Mortality was tracked for up to 19 years of follow-up, during which there were 4,518 deaths from cancer, 5,776 deaths from cardiovascular disease, and 3,002 deaths from other causes. Men whose serum alpha-tocopherol levels were in the highest one-fifth of participants had an 18 percent lower risk of death from all causes than those in the lowest fifth. The risk of dying from cancer was 21 percent lower, that of cardiovascular disease was 19 percent lower, and the risk of death from other causes was 30 percent lower for men in the top fifth compared to those whose vitamin E levels were lowest. Among cancer deaths, the risk of dying from prostate cancer was reduced by 32 percent and lung cancer by 21 percent for men in the highest group. Reductions in mortality risk were associated with values of up to 13 to 14 milligrams alpha-tocopherol per liter, which is within the normal range.

"Our findings support a more robust role for circulating alpha-tocopherol in overall, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality than was suggested by previous studies," the authors write. In their discussion, they note the discrepancies between their findings and those of previous trials concerning the effect of supplementing with vitamin E on mortality, and observe that high doses of alpha-tocopherol given alone reduce plasma concentrations of gamma and delta tocopherols, which might help explain results that found little or no benefit for vitamin E.

In an accompanying editorial, Maret G. Traber of the Linus Pauling Institute writes that only 12 milligrams per day vitamin E was estimated to result in serum levels within the middle range of participants in the ATBC study. However," Dr Traber notes, "12 mg vitamin E is an amount that is greater than that estimated to be consumed by 93% of men and 96% of women in the United States." She suggests that "the vitamin E recommended dietary allowance of 15 milligrams per day may yield optimal serum concentrations to achieve significant reductions in chronic disease mortality. However, 15 mg/d may be a vitamin E intake that is achieved only with supplements, given the dietary habits of most Americans and the observation that vitamin E–rich food sources are less popular foods."

Health Concern

Lung cancer

Novel approaches are urgently needed that reverse, suppress, or prevent lung cancer development (van Zandwijk N 2005). Early detection offers the best chance for long-term survival (Saba NF et al 2005). The conventional choices of treatment include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and depend on the type and stage of the cancer (European Lung Cancer Working Party 2006). Irrespective of the treatment method used, complementary therapy, such as nutritional supplementation and the use of bioresponse modifiers, is an important addition to traditional treatment that could help control symptoms, enhance quality of life, and improve overall survival (Jatoi A et al 2005b).

Life Extension suggests:

http://www.lef.org/protocols/cancer/lung_cancer_01.htm

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Super Booster Softgels with Advanced K2 Complex

Increasing evidence indicates that it may be dangerous to use to alpha-tocopherol form of vitamin E without also taking gamma-tocopherol. According to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, alpha-tocopherol displaces critically important gamma-tocopherol in the cells. While alpha-tocopherol inhibits lipid peroxidation, gamma tocopherol is needed to quench dangerous free radicals such as peroxynitrite.

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As an essential cofactor of glutathione peroxidase, selenium is an important antioxidant. It is also involved with iodine metabolism, DNA repair, immune function, and the detoxification of heavy metals. High doses of vitamin C (over 1 gram) may reduce the absorption of selenium. This mineral is best taken one hour before or 20 minutes after taking vitamin C supplements.

Super Selenium Complex contains the most advanced forms of selenium on the market. Vitamin E has been added because it works synergistically with selenium.

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Life Extension

October, 2006 issue of The Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw® Life Extension News™

  1. Special report on climate change
  2. Blueberry polyphenols increase lifespan and thermotolerance in C. elegans
  3. Beneficial effects of the laminar shear stress response mimicked by procyanidin-rich grape seed extract and hawthorn
  4. Farmed Atlantic salmon highly enriched in EPA and DHA
  5. C-reactive protein may induce leptin resistance
  6. Testosterone inhibits early atherogenesis in male mice
  7. Cognition-enhancing drugs may work exactly the same in rats as environmental enrichment
  8. Interleukin-1 beta, a mediator of inflammation and possibly aging
  9. Changes in white blood cell counts may predict increased risk of mortality in older women

http://www.lef.org/dsnews/ds_letter_2006_oct.htm

If you have questions or comments concerning this issue or past issues of Life Extension Update, send them to ddye@lifeextension.com or call 954 202 7716.

For longer life,

Dayna Dye
Editor, Life Extension Update
ddye@lifeextension.com
954 766 8433 extension 7716
www.lef.org

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