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Life Extension Update

February 16, 2007 Printer Friendly
In this issue

Life Extension Update Exclusive

Higher vitamin A intake cuts stomach cancer risk by half

Health Concern

Digestive disorders

Featured Products

Beta-Carotene Capsules

CarnoSoothe

Life Extension

February 2007 issue of The Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw® Life Extension News™ now online!

Life Extension Update Exclusive

Higher vitamin A intake cuts stomach cancer risk by half

A report published in the February, 2007 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition described the finding of researchers in Sweden that men and women who have a higher intake of vitamin A from food and supplements have half the risk of developing stomach cancer than that experienced by those whose intake is low.

Susanna C. Larsson of the Karolinska Institute and colleagues evaluated data from 82,002 adults aged 45 to 83 enrolled in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men. Participants in both studies completed identical dietary questionnaires in 1997 and were followed through June, 2005. Questionnaires were analyzed for preformed vitamin A (retinol from animal sources and fortified foods), provitamin A carotenoids alpha and beta-carotene, and other carotenoid levels.

Over the 7.2 year average follow-up period, there were 139 cases of stomach cancer. Subjects whose total vitamin A intake (including provitamin A carotenoids) from food and supplements was in the top one-fourth of participants had a 47 percent lower adjusted risk of developing stomach cancer than those whose intake was in the lowest fourth. When retinol from diet and supplements was examined separately, the risk was 44 percent lower for those in the highest intake group. For subjects whose alpha-carotene levels were in the top quarter, gastric cancer risk was 50 percent lower, and for participants whose beta-carotene levels were highest, the risk was 45 percent less than participants whose intake was lowest. No significant associations were determined for the carotenoids with no provitamin A activity. Further analysis of the data found that the reduction in gastric cancer risk associated with vitamin A was limited to nonsmokers or former smokers.

In their introduction, the authors remark that retinol plays a role in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation, and in modulating immune responses. The vitamin also has a healing effect on stomach ulcers, which have been associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The antioxidant activity of the vitamin neutralizes free radicals generated by H. pylori, a bacteria implicated in ulcers and stomach cancer.

The authors conclude that their results “support the hypothesis of a possible protective role of vitamin A in gastric carcinogenesis.”

Health Concern

Digestive disorders

The medical community has discovered that H. pylori bacteria cause most stomach ulcers. Blood tests can reveal the presence of the H. pylori antibody. Special antibiotic combinations can be used to eliminate H. pylori bacteria from the stomach within a matter of weeks. Those who fail to eradicate H. pylori are at a far greater risk for contracting stomach cancer.

Extracellular phospholipids, synthesized on gastric mucosa, assist in the hydrophobic, or nonwettable, characteristics of epithelium, yielding protection from stomach acid and injurious materials. The nonwettable status of the epithelium is extremely important to the health of the GIT. This valuable protection is, however, vulnerable and can be transformed by aspirin or NSAIDs from a nonwettable state, resistant to harmful substances, to a wettable epithelium. The mucosa is now susceptible to injury from caustic substances. Once the gastric mucosa has been disturbed, ulcers loom as an ongoing threat.

Polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PPC) has been shown to reduce the incidence of gastric ulcers, even after aggressive experimental ulcer inducement. Individuals at high risk for gastric ulcers, such as those taking high doses of either aspirin or NSAIDs, have lessened the injurious nature of the drugs when phospholipids are bound to the anti-inflammatory drugs (Leyck et al. 1985).

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-044.shtml

Featured Products

Beta-Carotene Capsules

Vitamin A (retinol) is a yellow, fat-soluble solid terpene alcohol obtained from some carotenoids by conversion in the liver, its storage organ. While carotenoids are widely distributed in such foods as green and yellow vegetables, retinol is not found in any vegetable sources, but is concentrated in egg yolks and the livers of many animals. Vitamin A, either from animal sources or synthesized in our own liver, is essential for growth and reproduction, maintaining healthy vision, and supporting protein synthesis and cell differentiation.

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00664.html

CarnoSoothe

An estimated 20 million Americans suffer stomach discomfort caused by erosion of the protective mucosal lining. A healthy mucosal lining is required to prevent acidic digestive juices from corroding the stomach wall. The presence of the Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) bacterium exerts proinflammatory effects in stomach tissue, further exacerbating stomach discomfort.

Protecting against known factors that damage the gastric lining is essential to ensuring optimal stomach health. CarnoSoothe combines three remarkable nutrient compounds that naturally inhibit the growth and damaging effects of H. pylori while protecting and restoring the health of the gastric lining.

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00958.html

Life Extension

The Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw® Life Extension News™

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For longer life,

Dayna Dye
Editor, Life Extension Update
ddye@lifeextension.com
954 766 8433 extension 7716
www.lef.org

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