Life Extension Final Clerance Sale

Life Extension Update

Life Extension Featured Article

February 11, 2011

Lifestyle beats genes in longevity race

Lifestyle beats genes in longevity race

An article published online on December 22, 2010 in the Journal of Internal Medicine reveals that our own actions may be more important than inherited factors in dictating how long we live.

For the current investigation, Lars Wilhelmsen and colleagues at the University of Gothenburg evaluated data from the 1913 Men epidemiological study, which enrolled 855 fifty-year-old men in 1963. Subjects provided anthropomorphic, parental and lifestyle data, and were examined for cardiovascular health and other functions. The men were re-evaluated at the ages of 54, 60 and 67.

Thirteen percent of the participants were still living at 90 years of age. These survivors were likelier at age 50 to be nonsmokers, drink moderate amounts of coffee, have higher socio-economic status and have lower serum cholesterol levels compared with men who failed to reach this age, yet the number of years attained by the men's parents did not appear to influence their own longevity.

The most important predictive factors at ages beyond 50 included having low blood pressure and good cardiorespiratory function. When predictive factors at all examinations were analyzed, being a nonsmoker, consuming low amounts of coffee, being of higher socioeconomic status, having low serum cholesterol, and possessing good physical working capacity emerged as significant.

"Our study shows that hereditary factors don't play a major role and that lifestyle has the biggest impact," stated professor emeritus Lars Wilhelmsen of Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg. "We're breaking new ground here. Many of these factors have previously been identified as playing a role in cardiovascular disease, but here we are showing for the first time that they are important for survival in general."

"The study clearly shows that we can influence several of the factors that decide how old we get," he added. "This is positive not only for the individual, but also for society as it doesn't entail any major drug costs."

Printer Friendly Save as PDF Email this Page View Archive Subscribe Today
Health Concern Life Extension Highlight

Atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

Atherosclerosis is a serious threat to the health of a staggering number of individuals across the globe. Its progression has been linked to increased risk of heart attack, stroke, atrial fibrillation and dementia, among other potentially fatal conditions. Since it may begin as early as childhood and aging has been identified as the greatest risk factor for its development, it is vital to combat this disease as early—and as aggressively—as possible. Unfortunately, if aging individuals leave the health of their arteries in the hands of mainstream medicine, they cannot expect conventional approaches to address all the risk factors that lead to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

Comprehensive blood testing helps aging individuals identify and target their specific risk factors, allowing for the development of a personalized, targeted treatment regimen that can be used to preserve and improve cardiovascular health.

In contrast to the methods of mainstream medicine, which address only very few heart disease risk factors, Life Extension has identified numerous scientifically validated ways by which aging individuals can improve the function of their endothelial cells and greatly reduce their risk of developing deadly atherosclerotic plaque buildup in their blood vessels.

Check out Life Extension on Twitter!

Life Extension Magazine February, 2011  

Get short, timely messages from Life Extension.

Twitter is a rich source of instantly updated information. It's easy to stay updated on an incredibly wide variety of topics. Join today and follow @LifeExtension

Get updates via SMS by texting follow LifeExtension to 40404 in the United States. http://twitter.com/LifeExtension

Featured Products

European Leg Solution Featuring Certified Diosmin 95

add to cart

As with so many “age-related” conditions, inflammation is the chief culprit behind the presence of unwanted visible leg veins. Inflammatory responses are precipitated by the interaction between white blood cells and the endothelial lining. Life Extension’s European Leg Solution featuring Certified Diosmin 95 affords effective protection, to disrupt this inflammatory response. This formulation has been shown to:

  1. Maintain healthy blood flow through your capillaries — the most fragile of your blood vessels.
  2. Maintain tone and elasticity of your veins — the key to sustained vascular health.
  3. Ease the inflammatory effects of free floating biochemical compounds.
  4. Safeguard collagen and elastin against oxidative damage.
  5. Enjoy an outstanding safety record.
  6. Produce results in 1-2 weeks, with a single 600 mg tablet each morning.

Ultra Soy Extract Capsules

add to cart

The three major isoflavones found in soybeans are genistin, daidzin, and glycitin. Soy isoflavones exert both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects, depending on the tissue in which they are acting. They are structurally similar to 17-estradiol, a mammalian estrogen, and are thus called phytoestrogens. They also have nonhormonal effects, including signal transduction and antioxidant activity. Soy isoflavones may inhibit bone resorption and help stimulate bone formation, without the side effects of hormone replacement therapy.

Ultra Soy Extract contains organic, non-GMO Soynatto® fermented soy food and has been reformulated with soybean powder extract standardized to isoflavones.

News Archive

Life Extension Update

What's Hot

Life Extension Magazine®

If you have questions or comments concerning this issue or past issues of Life Extension Update, send them to ddye@lifeextension.com or call 954 202 7716.

www.lef.org
Sign up for Life Extension Update

For Customer Service inquiries, please email customerservice@lifeextension.com or call 1 800 678 8989.

For copyright permission, please refer to Life Extension copyright policy.