DHEA


Table of Contents
image Dehydroepiandrosterone may be one of the regulators of cytokine production in atopic dermatitis.
image Reduction in the incidence and severity of collagen- induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice, using exogenous dehydroepiandrosterone.

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Dehydroepiandrosterone may be one of the regulators of cytokine production in atopic dermatitis.
Tabata N Tagami H Terui T
Arch Dermatol Res 1997 JUN;289(7):410-414
Tabata N, Tohoku Univ, Dept Dermatol, Sch Med, Aoba Ku, 1 1 Seiryo Machi, Sendai, Miyagi 98077, JAPAN

Previous studies in mice have shown that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) increases the production of Th1-associated lymphokines, and of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), by lymphocytes. However, there are no reports concerning the effect of DHEA on the production of Th2-associated lymphokines, IL-4 and IL-5, by lymphocytes in humans, We examined serum DHEA levels in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), which is thought to be associated with a higher activity of Th2 cells than of Th1 cells, We also studied the effects of DHEA on the production of IL-4 and IL-5 by human lymphocytes. Serum DHEA concentrations in 47 adult male patients with AD aged 19-30 years were significantly lower than those of 53 age- matched healthy male controls, Preincubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with DHEA reduced the IL-4 production by concanavalin A-stimulated PBMCs, Their IL-5 production also showed a tendency to decrease, These results suggest that DHEA may be one of the regulators of IgE synthesis and eosinophil proliferation in patients with AD and it may act by controlling IL-4, IL-5 and IL-2 production by lymphocytes.



Reduction in the incidence and severity of collagen- induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice, using exogenous dehydroepiandrosterone.
Williams PJ Jones RHV Rademacher TW
Arthritis Rheum 1997 MAY;40(5):907-911
Rademacher TW, Univ Coll London, Sch Med, Dept Mol Pathol, Mol Med Unit, London W1P 6DB, ENGLAND

Objective. This study examined the effect of exogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the onset, incidence, and severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. DHEA was administered subcutaneously prior to arthritis induction in DBA/1 mice, and the severity of the subsequent arthritis was monitored, Serum levels of total IgG and IgG isotype-specific anti-murine type II collagen were measured, Results. Repeated administration of DHEA during arthritis induction delayed the onset and decreased the severity of arthritis in male and female DBA/1 mice. DHEA failed to have an observable effect on established arthritis. IgG isotype autoantibody levels were found to be decreased in the sera of DHEA-treated mice. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous DHEA offered protection against the development of CIA. These data support the results of human studies in which low DHEA levels have been identified as a potential risk factor for the development of rheumatoid arthritis, These findings also highlight DHEA as a potential therapy worthy of further investigation.