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Abstracts

Life Extension Magazine September 2012
Abstracts

Coffee

Coffee and its consumption: benefits and risks.

Coffee is the leading worldwide beverage after water and its trade exceeds US $10 billion worldwide. Controversies regarding its benefits and risks still exist as reliable evidence is becoming available supporting its health promoting potential; however, some researchers have argued about the association of coffee consumption with cardiovascular complications and cancer insurgence. The health-promoting properties of coffee are often attributed to its rich phytochemistry, including caffeine, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, hydroxyhydroquinone (HHQ), etc. Many research investigations, epidemiological studies, and meta-analyses regarding coffee consumption revealed its inverse correlation with that of diabetes mellitus, various cancer lines, Parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, it ameliorates oxidative stress because of its ability to induce mRNA and protein expression, and mediates Nrf2-ARE pathway stimulation. Furthermore, caffeine and its metabolites help in proper cognitive functionality. Coffee lipid fraction containing cafestol and kahweol act as a safeguard against some malignant cells by modulating the detoxifying enzymes. On the other hand, their higher levels raise serum cholesterol, posing a possible threat to coronary health, for example, myocardial and cerebral infarction, insomnia, and cardiovascular complications. Caffeine also affects adenosine receptors and its withdrawal is accompanied with muscle fatigue and allied problems in those addicted to coffee. An array of evidence showed that pregnant women or those with postmenopausal problems should avoid excessive consumption of coffee because of its interference with oral contraceptives or postmenopausal hormones. This review article is an attempt to disseminate general information, health claims, and obviously the risk factors associated with coffee co3nsumption to scientists, allied stakeholders, and certainly readers.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2011 Apr;51(4):363-7

Association of coffee drinking with total and cause-specific mortality.

BACKGROUND: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages, but the association between coffee consumption and the risk of death remains unclear. METHODS: We examined the association of coffee drinking with subsequent total and cause-specific mortality among 229,119 men and 173,141 women in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study who were 50 to 71 years of age at baseline. Participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke were excluded. Coffee consumption was assessed once at baseline. RESULTS: During 5,148,760 person-years of follow-up between 1995 and 2008, a total of 33,731 men and 18,784 women died. In age-adjusted models, the risk of death was increased among coffee drinkers. However, coffee drinkers were also more likely to smoke, and, after adjustment for tobacco-smoking status and other potential confounders, there was a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and mortality. Adjusted hazard ratios for death among men who drank coffee as compared with those who did not were as follows: 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95 to 1.04) for drinking less than 1 cup per day, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90 to 0.99) for 1 cup, 0.90 (95% CI, 0.86 to 0.93) for 2 or 3 cups, 0.88 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.93) for 4 or 5 cups, and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.96) for 6 or more cups of coffee per day (P<0.001 for trend); the respective hazard ratios among women were 1.01 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.07), 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90 to 1.01), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.83 to 0.92), 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.90), and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78 to 0.93) (P<0.001 for trend). Inverse associations were observed for deaths due to heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections, but not for deaths due to cancer. Results were similar in subgroups, including persons who had never smoked and persons who reported very good to excellent health at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: In this large prospective study, coffee consumption was inversely associated with total and cause-specific mortality. Whether this was a causal or associational finding cannot be determined from our data. (Funded by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.).

N Engl J Med. 2012 May 17;366(20):1891-904

Antioxidant-rich coffee reduces DNA damage, elevates glutathione status and contributes to weight control: results from an intervention study.

Epidemiological and experimental evidence increasingly suggests coffee consumption to be correlated to prevention or delay of degenerative diseases connected with oxidative cellular stress. In an intervention study comprising 33 healthy volunteers, we examined DNA-protective and antioxidative effects exerted in vivo by daily ingestion of 750 mL of freshly brewed coffee rich in both green coffee bean constituents as well as roast products. The study design encompassed an initial 4 wk of wash-out, followed by 4 wk of coffee intake and 4 wk of second wash-out. At the start and after each study phase blood samples were taken to monitor biomarkers of oxidative stress response. In addition, body weight/composition and intake of energy/nutrients were recorded. In the coffee ingestion period, the primary endpoint, oxidative DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay (± FPG), was markedly reduced (p<0.001). Glutathione level (p<0.05) and GSR-activity (p<0.01) were elevated. Body weight (p<0.01)/body fat (p<0.05) and energy (p<0.001)/nutrient (p<0.001-0.05) intake were reduced. Our results allow to conclude that daily consumption of 3-4 cups of brew from a special Arabica coffee exerts health beneficial effects, as evidenced by reduced oxidative damage, body fat mass and energy/nutrient uptake.

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2011 May;55(5):793-7

Instant coffee with high chlorogenic acid levels protects humans against oxidative damage of macromolecules.

SCOPE: Coffee is among the most frequently consumed beverages. Its consumption is inversely associated to the incidence of diseases related to reactive oxygen species; the phenomenon may be due to its antioxidant properties. Our primary objective was to investigate the impact of consumption of a coffee containing high levels of chlorogenic acids on the oxidation of proteins, DNA and membrane lipids; additionally, other redox biomarkers were monitored in an intervention trial. METHODS AND RESULTS: The treatment group (n=36) consumed instant coffee co-extracted from green and roasted beans, whereas the control consumed water (800 mL/P/day, 5 days). A global statistical analysis of four main biomarkers selected as primary outcomes showed that the overall changes are significant. 8-Isoprostaglandin F2α in urine declined by 15.3%, 3-nitrotyrosine was decreased by 16.1%, DNA migration due to oxidized purines and pyrimidines was (not significantly) reduced in lymphocytes by 12.5 and 14.1%. Other markers such as the total antioxidant capacity were moderately increased; e.g. LDL and malondialdehyde were shifted towards a non-significant reduction. CONCLUSION: The oxidation of DNA, lipids and proteins associated with the incidence of various diseases and the protection against their oxidative damage may be indicative for beneficial health effects of coffee.

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Dec;54(12):1722-33

Coffee consumption and risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality among women with type 2 diabetes.

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Coffee has been linked to both beneficial and harmful health effects, but data on its relationship with cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes are sparse. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study including 7,170 women with diagnosed type 2 diabetes but free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline. Coffee consumption was assessed in 1980 and then every 2-4 years using validated questionnaires. A total of 658 incident cardiovascular events (434 coronary heart disease and 224 stroke) and 734 deaths from all causes were documented between 1980 and 2004. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, smoking and other cardiovascular risk factors, the relative risks were 0.76 (95% CI 0.50-1.14) for cardiovascular diseases (p trend = 0.09) and 0.80 (95% CI 0.55-1.14) for all-cause mortality (p trend = 0.05) for the consumption of >or=4 cups/day of caffeinated coffee compared with non-drinkers. Similarly, multivariable RRs were 0.96 (95% CI 0.66-1.38) for cardiovascular diseases (p trend = 0.84) and 0.76 (95% CI 0.54-1.07) for all-cause mortality (p trend = 0.08) for the consumption of >or=2 cups/day of decaffeinated coffee compared with non-drinkers. Higher decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated with lower concentrations of HbA(1c) (6.2% for >or=2 cups/day versus 6.7% for <1 cup/month; p trend = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: These data provide evidence that habitual coffee consumption is not associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases or premature mortality among diabetic women.

Diabetologia. 2009 May;52(5):810-7

Coffee consumption enhances high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux in macrophages.

RATIONALE: Association of habitual coffee consumption with coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality has not been established. We hypothesized that coffee may enhance reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) as the antiatherogenic properties of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). OBJECTIVE: This study was to investigate whether the phenolic acids of coffee and coffee regulates RCT from macrophages in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS: Caffeic acid and ferulic acid, the major phenolic acids of coffee, enhanced cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages mediated by HDL, but not apoA-I. Furthermore, these phenolic acids increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC)G1 and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), but not ABCA1. Eight healthy volunteers were recruited for the ex vivo study, and blood samples were taken before and 30 minutes after consumption of coffee or water in a crossover study. The mRNA as well as protein levels of ABCG1, SR-BI, and cholesterol efflux by HDL were increased in the macrophages differentiated under autologous sera obtained after coffee consumption compared to baseline sera. Finally, effects of coffee and phenolic acid on in vivo RCT were assessed by intraperitoneally injecting [(3)H]cholesterol-labeled acetyl low-density lipoprotein-loaded RAW264.7 cells into mice, then monitoring appearance of (3)H tracer in plasma, liver, and feces. Supporting in vitro and ex vivo data, ferulic acid was found to significantly increase the levels of (3)H tracer in feces. CONCLUSIONS: Coffee intake might have an antiatherogenic property by increasing ABCG1 and SR-BI expression and enhancing HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages via its plasma phenolic acids.

Circ Res. 2010 Mar 5;106(4):779-87

Consumption of coffee is associated with reduced risk of death attributed to inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases in the Iowa Women's Health Study.

BACKGROUND: Coffee is the major source of dietary antioxidants. The association between coffee consumption and risk of death from diseases associated with inflammatory or oxidative stress has not been studied. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation of coffee drinking with total mortality and mortality attributed to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other diseases with a major inflammatory component. DESIGN: A total of 41,836 postmenopausal women aged 55-69 y at baseline were followed for 15 y. After exclusions for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, colitis, and liver cirrhosis at baseline, 27,312 participants remained, resulting in 410,235 person-years of follow-up and 4265 deaths. The major outcome measure was disease-specific mortality. RESULTS: In the fully adjusted model, similar to the relation of coffee intake to total mortality, the hazard ratio of death attributed to cardiovascular disease was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.91) for consumption of 1-3 cups/d, 0.81 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.99) for 4-5 cups/d, and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.69, 1.09) for > or =6 cups/d. The hazard ratio for death from other inflammatory diseases was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.93) for consumption of 1-3 cups/d, 0.67 (95% CI: 0.50, 0.90) for 4-5 cups/d, and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.94) for > or =6 cups/d. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of coffee, a major source of dietary antioxidants, may inhibit inflammation and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular and other inflammatory diseases in postmenopausal women.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 May;83(5):1039-46

Coffee consumption modifies risk of estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer.

INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer is a complex disease and may be sub-divided into hormone-responsive (estrogen receptor (ER) positive) and non-hormone-responsive subtypes (ER-negative). Some evidence suggests that heterogeneity exists in the associations between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk, according to different estrogen receptor subtypes. We assessed the association between coffee consumption and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in a large population-based study (2,818 cases and 3,111 controls), overall, and stratified by ER tumour subtypes. METHODS: Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using the multivariate logistic regression models fitted to examine breast cancer risk in a stratified case-control analysis. Heterogeneity among ER subtypes was evaluated in a case-only analysis, by fitting binary logistic regression models, treating ER status as a dependent variable, with coffee consumption included as a covariate. RESULTS: In the Swedish study, coffee consumption was associated with a modest decrease in overall breast cancer risk in the age-adjusted model (OR> 5 cups/day compared to OR≤ 1 cup/day: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.99, P trend = 0.028). In the stratified case-control analyses, a significant reduction in the risk of ER-negative breast cancer was observed in heavy coffee drinkers (OR> 5 cups/day compared to OR≤ 1 cup/day : 0.43, 95% CI: 0.25, 0.72, P trend = 0.0003) in a multivariate-adjusted model. The breast cancer risk reduction associated with higher coffee consumption was significantly higher for ER-negative compared to ER-positive tumours (P heterogeneity (age-adjusted) = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: A high daily intake of coffee was found to be associated with a statistically significant decrease in ER-negative breast cancer among postmenopausal women.

Breast Cancer Res. 2011 May 14;13(3):R49

Coffee consumption and prostate cancer risk and progression in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

BACKGROUND: Coffee contains many biologically active compounds, including caffeine and phenolic acids, that have potent antioxidant activity and can affect glucose metabolism and sex hormone levels. Because of these biological activities, coffee may be associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis of 47,911 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who reported intake of regular and decaffeinated coffee in 1986 and every 4 years thereafter. From 1986 to 2006, 5035 patients with prostate cancer were identified, including 642 patients with lethal prostate cancers, defined as fatal or metastatic. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association between coffee and prostate cancer, adjusting for potential confounding by smoking, obesity, and other variables. All P values were from two-sided tests. RESULTS: The average intake of coffee in 1986 was 1.9 cups per day. Men who consumed six or more cups per day had a lower adjusted relative risk for overall prostate cancer compared with nondrinkers (RR = 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.68 to 0.98, P(trend) = .10). The association was stronger for lethal prostate cancer (consumers of more than six cups of coffee per day: RR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.75, P(trend) = .03). Coffee consumption was not associated with the risk of nonadvanced or low-grade cancers and was only weakly inversely associated with high-grade cancer. The inverse association with lethal cancer was similar for regular and decaffeinated coffee (each one cup per day increment: RR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.88 to 1.01, P = .08 for regular coffee and RR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.83 to 1.00, P = .05 for decaffeinated coffee). The age-adjusted incidence rates for men who had the highest (≥6 cups per day) and lowest (no coffee) coffee consumption were 425 and 519 total prostate cancers, respectively, per 100 000 person-years and 34 and 79 lethal prostate cancers, respectively, per 100 000 person-years. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a strong inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of lethal prostate cancer. The association appears to be related to non-caffeine components of coffee.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2011 Jun 8;103(11):876-84

Antihypertensive effects and mechanisms of chlorogenic acids.

Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) are potent antioxidants found in certain foods and drinks, most notably in coffee. In recent years, basic and clinical investigations have implied that the consumption of chlorogenic acid can have an anti-hypertension effect. Mechanistically, the metabolites of CGAs attenuate oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species), which leads to the benefit of blood-pressure reduction through improved endothelial function and nitric oxide bioavailability in the arterial vasculature. This review article highlights the physiological and biochemical findings on this subject and highlights some remaining issues that merit further scientific and clinical exploration. In the framework of lifestyle modification for the management of cardiovascular risk factors, the dietary consumption of CGAs may hold promise for providing a non-pharmacological approach for the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure.

Hypertens Res. 2012 Apr;35(4):370-4